Contributor Archive

  • Alan D. Valentine

    Alan D. Valentine joined the Nashville Symphony in June 1998. Since then, he has presided over an unprecedented period of growth at the Symphony, highlighted by recent GRAMMY® Awards for “Best Classical Album” and “Best Orchestral Performance” and seven GRAMMY® nominations; fifteen highly regarded and best selling CD releases on the Naxos and Decca labels; a total of eight national television broadcasts, one of which recently won an Emmy Award for “Special Event Live;” multiple national radio appearances, including the internationally syndicated radio series “American Encores;” a critically acclaimed Carnegie Hall debut and sold-out East Coast tour in September of 2000; two consecutive and very successful endowment campaigns in which a total of $145 million was raised; and the construction of the world-class, acoustically superb Schermerhorn Symphony Center which opened in September 2006.Valentine currently serves on the boards of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (Nashville Chapter), the Center for Nonprofit Management, the Nashville Arts Coalition, Steering Committee for Nashville’s Agenda and the Nashville City Club. He is a former member of the boards of the Nashville Chamber of Commerce and the Association of Non-Profit Executives. In addition, he is a member of the Rotary Club of Nashville, the 2008 class of Leadership Music, and he is a 2002 graduate of Leadership Nashville.Prior to his Nashville appointment, Valentine served for 10 years as executive director of the Oklahoma Philharmonic Society in Oklahoma City, OK. In addition, he served on the adjunct faculty of Oklahoma City University, where he taught graduate level arts administration courses.A graduate of the University of Houston, Valentine’s other earlier posts have included serving as the chief executive of the Mid-Columbia Symphony in Richland, WA, the Greensboro (NC) Symphony, the Chattanooga Symphony and Opera Association, and he served for two years as orchestra manager of the San Antonio Symphony.During his career, Valentine has helped produce multiple national television broadcasts, many LPs and compact discs, and numerous local radio and television broadcasts. Other accomplishments include managing several successful endowment campaigns and playing a significant role in leading three orchestras into successful major concert hall renovations, prior to the Schermerhorn Symphony Center project in Nashville.A long-time member of the League of American Orchestras (LAO), Valentine has served at various times as chairman for Group II and Group III Managers and as a member of Policy Committee A. Since 1997, he has served on the Manager’s Media Committee, which negotiated the landmark Internet Agreement with the American Federation of Musicians.

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  • Alex Ross

    Alex Ross has been the music critic of The New Yorker since 1996. From 1992 to 1996 he wrote for the New York Times. His first book, The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century, was published in 2007 by Farrar, Straus & Giroux and became a national bestseller. Selected as one of the New York Times's ten best books of year, The Rest Is Noise won a National Book Critics Circle Award, the Guardian First Book Award, and the Royal Philharmonic Society's Creative Communication Award, and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Samuel Johnson Prize. Ross has received an honorary doctorate from the Manhattan School of Music, a Letter of Distinction from the American Music Center, fellowships from the American Academy in Berlin and the Banff Centre, and three ASCAP-Deems Taylor Awards. He has served as a McGraw Professor in Writing at Princeton University, and in 2008 he was named a MacArthur Fellow. His next book, Listen to This, will appear in October 2010. A native of Washington, DC, Ross now lives in Manhattan. He is married to the actor and filmmaker Jonathan Lisecki.

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  • Alex Shapiro

    Composer Alex Shapiro aligns note after note with the hope that a few of them might sound good next to each other. A resident of Washington State's remote San Juan Island, Alex has become one of the Pacific coast's best known composers of acoustic and electroacoustic chamber music, and her works are performed and broadcast weekly across the U.S. and internationally. Educated at The Juilliard School and Manhattan School of Music as a student of Ursula Mamlok and John Corigliano, Alex's pieces can be heard on over twenty commercially released CDs from record labels around the world. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of the American Music Center, sits on ASCAP's Symphony & Concert Committee, and is the past President of the Board of Directors of the American Composers Forum of Los Angeles. Alex is a familiar face in the new music community as a writer and public speaker, including her interviews of over 100 colleagues as the host of the Los Angeles Composer Salon series, now in its tenth year. When she's not composing, she can be found communing with the sea life that surrounds her, as seen on her music and photo-filled blog, www.notesfromthekelp.com and her website, www.alexshapiro.org.

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  • Andrew Druckenbrod

    At the age of thirty-four, <strong>Andrew Druckenbrod</strong> is among the younger full-time classical music critics in the United States. He has been chief critic at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette since 1999, covering such institutions as the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and the Pittsburgh Opera. In 2003, he received the inaugural Tom Gibb Award from the Post-Gazette for “artful writing about the arts and for classic coverage of classical music.” He regularly contributes reviews and features to such national and international publications as Gramophone (U.K.), Opera (U.K.), OperaNews, American Record Guide, NewMusicBox.com and Symphony. He has appeared on WNYC’s acclaimed program “Soundcheck.”Druckenbrod has a background as a cellist, pianist, singer and conductor, but it is his education as a musicologist at the University of Notre Dame (B.A.) and the University of Minnesota (M.A.) that has most informed his writing on music.Prior to running the classical beat in Pittsburgh, Druckenbrod wrote about classical music on the staff of the Star Tribune of Minneapolis/St. Paul, and was a contributor for publications such as the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and Strings. He has taught courses on classical music.A member of the Music Critics Association of North America and of the American Musicological Society, Druckenbrod is known for his sensible and engaging prose that reaches out to readers of all backgrounds with accessibility and depth. The catholic breadth of his background combined with a keen understanding of context has allowed Druckenbrod to cover the Pittsburgh music scene with fairness and accuracy while giving voice to under-appreciated aspects of the field, such as early music and contemporary composition. His blog, <a href="http://www.post-gazette.com/music/classicalmusings/"> Classical Musings </a>, debuted in 2007 on post-gazette.com.

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  • Ben Smith

    <strong>Ben Smith</strong> is a physics graduate student and the author of the blog <a href="http://classicalconvert.com/">Classical Convert</a>. Up until the age of 24 his classical music experiences were limited to films and TV, and a dance he made up to “Flight of The Bumblebee” when he was three years old. He now hopes to help convince other people with a similarly non-classical background to start listening to the genre with the help of his website and blog, and likes to think that his particular classical music background might actually be beneficial toward this goal. He was born in London, and attended Bristol University in the UK where he received his MSci in Physics. Currently he is working toward his PhD at Cornell University in upstate New York, designing, building and operating machines that gently rip apart individual strands of DNA with lasers. His daily work varies from fabricating parts from aluminum in the machine shop, to spending days at a time simulating the forces that proteins apply to DNA as your cells copy or repair themselves. He likes to listen to Shostakovitch while performing these duties.

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  • Bill Harris

    Bill Harris has observed companies for over 30 years as an engineer, manager, and internal and external consultant and facilitator. He has worked in a 4,000 employee European company, a Fortune 50 multinational, and a Fortune 500 high tech company, filling roles in R&D, Manufacturing, Quality, and Finance and Administration.During this time, he’s learned that it’s hard to link an organization’s actions to its goals, to work really effectively in groups, and to get the time to learn and grow from our experiences. For many organizations distributed around the world, it’s hard to workeffectively without the cost in time and money of frequent travel.He enjoys working collaboratively with those who want to address such issues in their organizations. He helped one organization reduce cycle time by 83% as they changed their processes and became a self-directed work team for faster decision making and better responsiveness. He helped a manager reduce spending variance by 95% based on a system dynamics investigation. He routinely trains managers and helps groups function more effectively, even when they’re not located in the same place.

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  • Blair Tindall

    JOURNALIST AND OBOIST BLAIR TINDALL writes about classical music for the New York Times and has performed, toured and recorded with the New York Philharmonic. She completed "Mozart in the Jungle" during a fellowship in 2004 at The MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, NH.**A RICH AND VARIED MUSICAL CAREERAs an oboist, Tindall enjoys a musical career ranging from the classical stage of Carnegie Hall to the late-night ambiance of New York's famed Blue Note Jazz Club. She presented her critically acclaimed Weill Recital Hall debut in 1991 and captured a top prize in the 1988 Lucarelli Competition for Solo Oboists. A busy classical artist, Tindall has appeared both at home and abroad with the New York Philharmonic and its fifteen-member chamber ensemble and has played principal oboe with the New York Philharmonic, the San Francisco Symphony, the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the Orchestra of St. Luke's, the New York City Ballet and Opera Orchestras and the New Jersey Symphony. She has also appeared with the Pittsburgh Symphony, the San Jose Symphony, Ballet and Opera, the New England Bach Festival, Bargemusic, the Lark and Colorado String Quartets and was principal oboist of the Vivaldi Traveling Circus.A special interest in contemporary music has led to numerous premieres and commissions for Tindall. She presented the world premiere of Edward Thomas' "Images" with the Vivaldi Traveling Circus, and she also collaborated with composer Carlos Franzetti on the first recording of his "Oboe Concerto." Included on the program of her Dame Myra Hess recital in Chicago was Elizabeth Brown's "Boll Weevil," which was written expressly for her, as was that composer's "A Fragile Barrier," which premiered on Cape Cod with pianist Samuel Sanders as accompanist. She has also twice appeared as soloist with the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players.Tindall can be heard on many film, radio and television soundtracks, including the theme music for National Public Radio's Performance Today as well as soundtracks for the films, "Crooklyn," "Mad Dog and Glory," "A Little Sex," "Twilight" and "Snake Eyes." She was singled out by CD Review magazine for her solo performance on the motion picture soundtrack of Spike Lee's "Malcolm X." A featured artist on jazz trumpeter John Faddis' album, "Remembrances," (nominated for a 1999 Grammy Award), Ms. Tindall has also appeared with Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts and his quintet.Tindall has recorded for the Opus One, Deutsche Grammophon, Chesky, Columbia, Varese Sarabande, Nonesuch and Premier record labels. She has held the solo oboe chair of the Broadway productions of Les Miserables, Miss Saigon, Man of La Mancha, and Aspects of Love, was principal oboist of the Hudson Valley Philharmonic from 1986-99, and she is a voting member of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (GRAMMY).**WRITING AND TEACHING IN DIVERSE FIELDSIn addition to her reporting for the New York Times, Tindall writes regularly about environmental issues for Sierra magazine. Her work has also appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the International Herald Tribune, Harvard's Nieman Reports, the Hearst-owned San Francisco Examiner,Yoga Journal, Strings, Symphony, and Art & Antiques. She holds an MA in journalism from Stanford University, BM and MM degrees in music performance from the Manhattan School of Music, and a BCI Certificate in business from Columbia University, where she also studied chemistry, mathematics, economics, and political science while working at night in the Broadway orchestra pits of "Miss Saigon" and "Les Miserables."Tindall was a staff business writer at the San Francisco Examiner and staff critic-at-large for the Contra Costa Times, a Knight Ridder newspaper in California. Tindall has taught journalism at Stanford University and at Mediabistro both in San Francisco and New York, and has taught oboe at the University of California-Berkeley and at Mills College. In her spare time, she runs, hikes, bicycles, swims; has led SCUBA dives as a PADI-certified divemaster; and has held a technician-class amateur ("ham") radio license since 1979 with the callsign KA2KXS.Tindall completed a residency at Wyoming's Ucross Foundation in 2005, then wrote as guest arts critic for the Charleston (SC) Post-Courier during the Spoleto USA Festival. She lives in Los Angeles, where she is creating a travel television show about world music and dance.

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  • Brian Bell

    Brian Bell is producer of The Boston Symphony Orchestra, WGBH 89.7’s Friday afternoon live broadcasts from Symphony Hall; BSO On Record; a collection of recordings from the Boston Symphony Orchestra; and Sunday Concert, featuring the finest concert recordings from around the world.Bell not only helps bring these live performances to air, he also has interviewed many musicians for the WGBH 89.7 Symphony broadcasts, including Erich Leinsdorf, Yo-Yo Ma, Sir Simon Rattle, Henri Dutilleux, James Levine, Bernard Haitink, Sir Michael Tippett, and many others. He has been with WGBH since 1985, producing such coast-to-coast broadcasts as the Vienna Philharmonic’s annual concert, New Year’s Day from Vienna, and the International Music Series.Involved with radio for more than 30 years, Bell has helped create a number of significant broadcasts for several of the world’s leading networks. For the BBC, he co-produced a live concert from Tanglewood in July 1996; for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, he helped produce a live concert broadcast of the Calgary Philharmonic from Symphony Hall; he worked for National Public Radio (NPR) on the live coast-to-coast transmission of the 1998 benefit concert for former BSO Managing Director Kenneth Haas.While a student at the Eastman School of Music, Bell produced the weekly Music from Eastman series, heard throughout the United States and on the Voice of America.A musician himself, Bell pursued an active career as a professional horn player for more than two decades. He has made commercial recordings with the Eastman Wind Ensemble, the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra of Boston, and the Boston Philharmonic.With the Boston Symphony, he produced of historic BSO recordings. The premiere issue, The First Recordings of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, was acclaimed by the Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Lloyd Schwartz in the Boston Phoenix, and was a best seller in Boston area record stores. The second release, featuring the BSO recordings of November 22, 1944, was cited by David Patrick Stearns of USA Today as one of the best releases of 1996.

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  • Brian Sacawa

    Praised as “an inventive musician” (The New York Times), “inspired” (The Washington Post), “brilliant” (The Baltimore Sun), and a “sharp new music saxophonist” (Time Out New York), Brian Sacawa has firmly established himself as an important contemporary voice for his instrument. Active internationally as a soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician, his versatile career has led to appearances ranging from the concert stage to club settings as well as the premieres of over 50 new works by both established and emerging composers. Mr. Sacawa’s critically acclaimed, Grammy-winning recordings can be heard on the Naxos, Innova, Equilibrium, and BiBimBop record labels. He holds degrees from the University of Michigan, the Peabody Conservatory, and the University of Massachusetts–Amherst, where he studied with Donald Sinta, Gary Louie, and Lynn Klock. He is the co-founder of the new music duo Hybrid Groove Project, with composer/turntablist DJ Dubble8, co-curator of Mobtown Modern, and the author of the blog Sounds Like Now. Mr. Sacawa currently serves as saxophonist with The U.S. Army Field Band. He resides in Baltimore, MD.

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  • Brian Wise

    Brian Wise is a producer at WNYC Radio where he works on the daily music talk show "Soundcheck." He also writes about music for a number of publications including the BBC Music Magazine, Listen, MusicalAmerica.com and The Strad.

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  • Carlos Kalmar

    <strong>Carlos Kalmar</strong> was appointed Music Director of the <a href="http://www.orsymphony.org/">Oregon Symphony Orchestra</a> in 2003, and is also Principal Conductor of the <a href="http://www.grantparkmusicfestival.com/index.shtml">Grant Park Music Festival</a> in Chicago. Until recently he was also Music Director of Vienna’s Tonkunstlerorchester. During his career, he has been Music Director of the Hamburg Symphony, Stuttgart Philharmonic and the Anhaltisches Theater in Dessau, Germany.Carlos Kalmar’s most recent recordings include the 2006 release of the Szymanowski, Martinu and Bartok Violin Concertos with the Grant Park Orchestra and Jennifer Koh, and the 2003 release of the Joachim and Brahms Violin Concertos featuring Rachel Barton and the Chicago Symphony, and American Works for Organ and Orchestra featuring David Schrader and the Grant Park Orchestra (2002), both on the Cedille Records label.Carlos Kalmar was born in Uruguay to Austrian parents. He showed an interest in music at an early age and began studying violin at age six. By age 15 his musical development led him to the Vienna Academy of Music where he studied conducting with Karl Osterreicher. He resides in Portland, Oregon and Vienna.

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  • Ceci Dadisman

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  • Charles Noble

    Charles Noble joined the Oregon Symphony as Assistant principal violist in 1995. In 1993 he was first-prize winner of the Seattle Ladies Musical Club Competition. He received the C.D. Jackson Award at the Tanglewood Music Center and was awarded the Israel Dorman String Prize at the Peabody Conservatory of Music.He holds degrees from the University of Puget Sound, the University of Maryland, and the Peabody Conservatory of Music. His primary teachers were Joyce A. Ramée, Joseph dePaquale, Michael Tree, and Roberto Díaz. An avid chamber musician, his early chamber music studies were with the Guarneri Quartet, Earl Carlyss, and the Peabody Trio. As a member of the Ethos Quartet he has performed in masterclasses and coachings with members of the Takacs, Fine Arts and Emerson quartets.His solo appearances with the Oregon Symphony include two performances the Mozart Sinfonie Concertante, the West Coast premiere of the Joseph Castaldo Viola Concerto, Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 with OSO Principal violist Joël Belgique, and the Bruch Romanze for Viola and Orchestra. Other solo appearances include the Cascade Festival of Music, the Sunriver Music Festival, the Chico Symphony, and a recital appearance at the Abbey Bach Festival.Charles was a member of the faculty at the inaugural session of the National Youth Orchestra Festival at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, and is co-founder and a member of the faculty of the Max Aronoff Viola Institute in Seattle, Washington, where he has performed chamber music and recital repertoire.He has published two articles on audition preparation appearing the July and August 1999 issues of The Strad magazine; his article profiling violist Roberto Díaz appeared in the January 2003 issue.He was one of three American violists invited to tour Japan with the Super World Orchestra 2000, whose roster included members of the Vienna Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra and Cleveland Orchestra. In December of 2000, he was visiting master teacher at the University of Nevada at Reno.He has been a featured performer at the 2002, 2004 and 2006 International Viola Congresses. In 2005, he co-founded the Arnica Quartet with violinists Shin-young Kwon and Sarah Roth, and cellist Heather Blackburn. He was previously a founding member of the acclaimed Ethos Quartet.

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  • Chris Felcyn

    Chris Felcyn is a producer and program host for WRCJ-FM, 90.9 in Detroit, a public radio service managed for the Detroit Public Schools by Detroit Public Television.A 40-year veteran of public broadcasting, Chris’ career was heavily frontloaded with television experience as a producer-director for WTVS and later as a successful free-lancer specializing in large-scale corporate presentations. But through it all, he always made time to dabble in classical (and jazz) radio.This year will mark the 25th anniversary of <em>The Listening Room</em>, a popular Sunday morning staple for many Detroit area listeners, featuring a cornucopia of classical, jazz and world music. His annual sendup of Super Bowl Sunday, <em>The Symphony Bowl</em>, has been awarded Best in Category twice by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters. Since 2005, Chris has been the host of <em>The Well-Tempered Wireless</em>, heard weekday afternoons on WRCJ.Chris is also executive producer of <em>DSO Unmasked</em>, and <em>The Civic in Concert</em>, produced in cooperation with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.Among the interview guests who have appeared on Chris’ shows are Joshua Bell, Regina Carter, John Corigliano, Antal Dorati, Bela Fleck, Leon Fleisher, Marvin Hamlisch, Sharon Isbin, Neeme Jarvi, Erich Kunzel, Ruth Laredo, Drew McManus, Edgar Meyer, Gil Shaham, Leonard Slatkin, and Ellen Taafe Zwilich.Off the air, he was a contributor to the <em>Omnibus Essential Guide to Classical CDs</em> published by G. Schirmer, and has earned two Emmys from the Michigan chapter of NATAS for his work in public television.Chris’ reported penchant for making rude noises with cast-off bassoon parts has been greatly exaggerated.

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  • Christopher Blair

    As Senior Scientist and Principal Consultant, he collaborates on all the firm’s major projects, focusing in particular on room acoustic design. Chris’ contributions can be heard in the widely praised Schermerhorn Symphony Center for the Nashville Symphony, the Rosch Recital Hall at SUNY-Fredonia (photo, top right), Mixon Hall at the Cleveland Institute of Music, and in renovations to the Eastman Theatre and the new Hatch Recital Hall for the Eastman School of Music, among others.Chris earned dual Bachelors degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Music from the University of Vermont and Masters degrees in Orchestral Conducting from the New England Conservatory, and in Acoustics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been a member of the faculties of M.I.T., UMASS/Lowell, Brown University, and Yale University, and currently serves on the Strategic Planning Committee of the New Haven Symphony and the Board of Directors of the Conductors Guild.

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  • Christopher Foley

    Christopher Foley is a pianist dedicated to the fields of teaching, chamber music, art song, opera, and contemporary music. At the Eastman School of Music, he received a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in 1994, majoring in Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music as a student of Jean Barr and David Burge. Other notable studies include Academy of the West, Aspen Music Festival, and Holland Music Sessions. He is a former teacher at the University of British Columbia and the Vancouver Academy of Music. In 1989 at the Eckhardt-Gramatté Competition for the Performance of Contemporary Music, he won first prize for the performance of the commissioned work (Walter Buczinski’s Mosaics) and third prize overall. In 1991, he won first prize in piano at the Kneisel Competition for the Performance of German Lieder in Rochester, New York. Chris Foley was the Vice President of the Ontario Chapter of NATS from 2003 to 2006, and is a member of Toronto Musicians’ Association. As a member of the studio company at Tapestry New Opera Works, he is a dedicated participant in the new opera creation process. He also spent fourteen summers as resident pianist for the Bowdoin Summer Music Festival, and has appeared with Continuum Contemporary Music, the Vancouver New Music Ensemble, Eastman Musica Nova, and Eastman Intermusica. Since 2003, he has served on the faculty of the Royal Conservatory of Music, where he teaches piano, collaborative piano, vocal coaching, vocal literature, and is currently the head of the voice department at the RCM Community School.

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  • Connie Linsler Valentine

    Connie Linsler Valentine has been Executive Director of the Nashville Chamber Orchestra since 2002. Prior to joining the NCO she served as the Executive Director of the Florida Philharmonic Orchestra and for seven years she was Executive Director of the Greater Akron Musical Association, encompassing the Akron Symphony Orchestra, the Akron Youth Symphony, the Akron Symphony Chorus, and Akron Symphony Gospel Choir. Valentine led the Association’s campaigns resulting in the orchestra’s first recording project on Telarc, a nationally recognized outreach program, which included “Gospel Meets Symphony,” and a multi-million dollar endowment drive. She also served as Executive Director of the Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale.She began her career as a participant in the American Symphony Orchestra League (ASOL) Orchestra Management Fellowship program. During her Fellowship she worked with the Boston Symphony, Hartford Symphony and Oregon Symphony Orchestra.Ms. Valentine holds a B.S. in Business Administration with a minor in music. She has been a consultant to arts groups, served in leadership roles in the ASOL national manager groups, and been a speaker/presenter at the local, state and national level. With a commitment to community, she has served on numerous community boards in the cities in which she has lived. She is a member of the Nashville Chamber of Commerce’s Music Association Task Force and has chaired the Nashville Convention and Visitor Bureaus Awesome April Campaign. She has been a participant in the Leadership Akron and Leadership Midland programs and is currently a member of Rotary and CABLE.Since her time with the Nashville Chamber Orchestra, the NCO has forged new territories for the ensemble, which, in addition to its Adventure Series, Acoustic Café Series and annual specials, performed for both the 2003 and 2004 Amy Grant/Vince Gill U.S. Christmas Tour traveling to 34 cities and reaching over 200,000 people. The NCO initiated its new Kid Pan Alley education program, the CD from which has won three national children’s media awards and a GRAMMY nomination. To stretch all boundaries, in 2004 the NCO performed for 90,000 fans with Phish’s Trey Anastasio at the Bonnaroo Music Festival in Manchester, TN.Ms. Valentine moved to Nashville in 2002 to be married and feels fortunate to have also found a marriage with the Nashville Chamber Orchestra.

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  • Curtis Long

    Curtis Long has served as Executive Director of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra since July 1, 2008. Long’s appointment was the culmination of a three month search process involving ASO board members, musicians, and staff.Prior to his tenure at the ASO Long was Executive Director of the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra for 14 years. In Dayton he led the organization through a period of unprecedented artistic and organizational growth and recognition as one of the nation’s top regional orchestras, highlighted by the March 2003 opening of the new $125 million Schuster Performing Arts Center complex. During his tenure the orchestra received seven ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming, tripled its endowment, and more than doubled ticket sales.His prior experience also includes an Executive Director post at the Delaware Symphony Association and a series of positions at Shafer Event Management, Inc. culminating in a Director of Finance post. Long is an alumnus of the League of American Orchestras’ Orchestra Management Fellowship program, with assignments at the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Houston Symphony among others.Long’s plans for the ASO include expanded audiences, a larger variety of both traditional and innovative programming and continued commitment to fiscal stability through increasing ticket revenues, broadening our donor base and increasing the orchestra’s endowment. One of Long’s initial priorities for the ASO is a substantial expansion of educational programming, including not just orchestral concerts for children but also bringing musicians into classrooms and offering training programs for young instrumentalists.Long earned an MBA from the University of California, Berkley with an emphasis in not-for-profit management. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Chicago with a Bachelor of Arts degree. Long played French horn for eight years and is an avid cook.

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  • David J. Loehr

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  • Dr. Charles T. Downey

    <strong>Dr. Charles T. Downey</strong> is a musicologist, teacher of music and art history, pianist, organist, and choral singer. He earned a Bachelor of Music in Piano from Michigan State University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in musicology from Catholic University, with research specializations in medieval music and French Baroque ballet and opera. He sings professionally with the Choir of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. While he writes prolifically on many subjects, his specialties are French culture, opera, and early and modern music. Since June 2003, Downey has been moderating <a href="http://www.ionarts.org/">Ionarts</a>, an online journal for classical music and the fine arts in Washington, D.C. He was profiled by Marc Fisher of the Washington Post as <a href="http://blog.washingtonpost.com/rawfisher/2007/12/blogger_of_the_month_critical.html">Blogger of the Month</a> last December. In March, his first newspaper review was <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/NewsSearch?st=%22charles+t.+downey%22&fn=&sfn=&sa=ns&cp=&hl=false&sb=-1&sd=&ed=&blt=&sdt=&x=0&y=0">published</a> in the Washington Post.

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  • Drew McManus

    "I hear that every time you show up to work with an orchestra, people get fired." Those were the first words out of an executive's mouth after her board chair introduced us. That executive is now a dear colleague and friend but the day that consulting contract began with her orchestra, she was convinced I was a hatchet-man brought in by the board to clean house. I understand where the trepidation comes from as a great deal of my consulting and technology provider work for arts organizations involves due diligence, separating fact from fiction, interpreting spin, as well as performance review and oversight. So yes, sometimes that work results in one or two individuals "aggressively embracing career change" but far more often than not, it reinforces and clarifies exactly what works and why. In short, it doesn't matter if you know where all the bodies are buried if you can't keep your own clients out of the ground, and I'm fortunate enough to say that for more than 15 years, I've done exactly that for groups of all budget size from Qatar to Kathmandu. For fun, I write a daily blog about the orchestra business, provide a platform for arts insiders to speak their mind, keep track of what people in this business get paid, help write a satirical cartoon about orchestra life, hack the arts, and love a good coffee drink.

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  • Elizabeth Lunday

    Elizabeth Lunday is a freelance journalist and author specializing in music, art, architecture, and culture. As well as writing the “Masterpieces” column for mental_floss magazine, she’s penned two books: Secret Lives of Great Composers and Secret Lives of Great Artists, both from Quirk Books. Her mother would like you to know that they make great birthday and holiday gifts. The books will also provide you with critical information on which great artists and composers suffered from which STDs. There’s nothing like leaning over to a friend in a particular fraught moment of a concert and whispering, “You know, he had syphilis.” Lunday sometimes tells people from the coasts that she’s from North Austin, because people in L.A. and New York think Austin is cool; in fact, she’s from Fort Worth, Texas, which may not be as cool but has a lower cost of living and a fantastic symphony orchestra plus the Van Cliburn competition, so take that South-by-Southwest.

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  • Evan Schumacher

    Evan Schumacher is a co-founder of InstantEncore, a technology company that provides services to artists and arts organizations to help them reach and grow their audience. At InstantEncore he helped design the digital asset management system that drives the online and mobile presence of artists and arts organizations around the world. He specializes in the technical aspects of the service including system design, database architecture and web services. He received his Bachelor of Sciences and Masters Degree from the University of California at San Diego in Electrical Engineering with a focus on Computer Vision.

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  • Frank J. Oteri

    <strong>Frank J. Oteri</strong> joined the staff of the American Music Center in November 1998 to serve as the editor of its Web magazine NewMusicBox, which he has done since its launch in May 1999. An outspoken crusader for new music and the breaking down of barriers between genres, Frank has written for publications including BBC Music, Chamber Music, Ear Magazine, Stagebill/Playbill, Symphony, Time Out New York and the Revised New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, has been a frequent radio and pre-concert speaker, and has served as the host for ASCAP’s <a href="http://www.ascap.com/concert/thruthewalls/">Thru The Walls</a> showcase, Meet The Composer’s “<a href="http://www.meetthecomposer.org/works.html">The Works</a>” in Minneapolis, and the 21st Century Schizoid Music series at the <a href="http://www.corneliastreetcafe.com/">Cornelia Street Café</a>. Frank’s own musical compositions–which span operas and chamber music, solo keyboard works and original bluegrass/old-timey songs for his band The String Messengers–have been performed in venues ranging from Carnegie’s Weill Recital Hall, the Los Angeles Contemporary Museum of Art and the Theatre Royal in Bath, England to Galapagos, the Knitting Factory, the Sidewalk Café and the Bethlehem Musikfest (PA) and have been performed by pianists Sarah Cahill, Jenny Lin, Guy Livingston, and Marvin Rosen, harpsichordist Rebecca Pechefsky, guitarist Dominic Frasca, the Magellan String Quartet, Sylvan Winds, Pentasonic Winds, and the PRISM Saxophone Quartet, among others. <a href="http://www.machunas.com/">MACHUNAS</a>, a “performance oratorio in four colors” based on the life of Fluxus-founder George Maciunas created in collaboration with painter/performance artist Lucio Pozzi, is being staged at the Contemporary Arts Centre in Vilnius, Lithuania as part of the International Christopher Summer Festival in a production conducted by Donatas Katkus (August 20-21, 2005). Frank holds a B.A. and a M.A. (in Ethnomusicology) from Columbia University where he served as Classical Music Director and World Music Director for <a href="http://www.columbia.edu/cu/wkcr/">WKCR-FM</a>.

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  • Frank Manheim

    Frank T. Manhein is seriously interested in music: baroque music, Georg Philipp Telemann, 20th Century trends in music; rock music's background and importance Science policy, and the scientific and technical effectiveness of nations American cultural and political trends

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  • Galen Brown

    The music of Galen H. Brown is best classified as “post-minimalist,” drawing inspiration from composers such as Steve Reich, David Lang, and Michael Gordon, but also occasionally from popular and rock traditions. He has a particular interest in composing for mid-sized chamber ensembles, in combining electronics and digital processing with traditional instruments, and in using production techniques traditionally associated with rock music.As a contributing editor to the award-winning new-music website Sequenza21.com, he has covered issues from arts funding and economics to the uptown/downtown divide in contemporary music, to the nature of media coverage of classical music.Brown was born in Fredericksburgh, VA, and raised in Binghamton, NY, and Hanover, NH. He attended Brandeis University for two years, where he studied with David Rakowski, before transferring to Dartmouth College, where he finished his bachelor’s degree studying with Jon Appleton and briefly with Kui Dong. Following graduation in 2001, he moved to Boston, MA, where he worked for a year before beginning a Master’s degree at New England Conservatory, studying with Lee Hyla. On completion of the M.M., he returned to Hanover to work in the development office of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and in 2006 he relocated to New York City to join the database management team in the development office of the New York Philharmonic.

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  • Gary Ginstling

    Gary Ginstling was appointed Director of Communications and External Affairs for the San Francisco Symphony (SFS) in July 2006. As Director of Communications and External Affairs, Gary Ginstling is a member of the SFS senior management team and assists in the setting of institutional policies, practice, and direction. His responsibilities at the SFS encompass the oversight and direction of public relations, public affairs, publications, and the organization’s education/youth orchestra and community engagement activities. Prior to joining the SFS, Mr. Ginstling was Executive Director of the Berkeley Symphony Orchestra, a position he had held since 2003. At the Berkeley Symphony, Mr. Ginstling was responsible for a number of initiatives that helped enhance the orchestra’s reputation for creative programming and innovative projects. During his tenure, the orchestra gave six world premiere performances, received three ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming, and was a recipient of the inaugural “Bank of America Award for Excellence in Music Education,” a national award presented by the League of American Orchestras. These artistic achievements were accomplished in a fiscally responsible manner, as Mr. Ginstling oversaw three consecutive years of balanced budgets, the elimination of all outstanding debt, and a significant increase in ticket sales. Prior to joining the Berkeley Symphony, he spent three years as a Marketing Manager for multimedia and emerging markets with Sun Microsystems. Mr. Ginstling has also spent many years as a professional orchestra musician. He is currently in his tenth season as principal clarinetist with the New West Symphony in Ventura County and has performed with the San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Santa Barbara Symphony and the New World Symphony, among others. Mr. Ginstling has served local arts organizations in a variety of roles. He is a board member of the Association of California Symphony Orchestras (ACSO) and served as a board member of the San Francisco Opera BRAVO! Club for young professionals. Mr. Ginstling holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University, a Master of Music from The Juilliard School, and an MBA from The Anderson School at UCLA.

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  • geelhoed@insidethearts.com

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  • George Daugherty

    George Daugherty made his conducting debut in 1975 in his home state of Indiana, at age 20, conducting for Metropolitan Opera soprano Roberta Peters and his Pendleton Festival Symphony, a summer orchestra he had founded. His major symphony orchestra debut came in 1978, with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra at The Eastman Theatre. During his 20’s, he was a conductor for American Ballet Theatre, the Bayerische Statsoper / Bavarian State Opera and Ballet, major Italian opera houses in Milan, Turin, Florence, Regio Emilia, and Rome, and was the music director of The Chicago City Ballet, Ballet Chicago, and Louisville Ballet (conducting hundreds of performances with The Louisville Orchestra.) Since then, Daugherty has guest conducted virtually every major symphony orchestra in America and Canada, including repeated guest engagements with Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cleveland Orchestra, The Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, National Symphony, Houston Symphony, Dallas Symphony, Seattle Symphony, St. Louis Symphony, Toronto Symphony, Vancouver Symphony, Calgary Philharmonic, National Arts Centre Orchestra, and scores of others. Internationally, he has conducted frequently for The Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra, both in London and on international tour, as well as The Sydney Symphony at The Sydney Opera House, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra during the 2010 inaugural season of their new DR Concert Hall, the RTÉ Concert Orchestra, The New Japan Philharmonic, The Malaysian Philharmonic, the Orquesta del Teatro de Bellas Artes in Mexico City, and numerous others. Daugherty was one of the very first conductors to pair symphony orchestras with big screen visuals, and has received critical acclaim for the creation of his unique “film and orchestra” concerts, including “Bugs Bunny on Broadway,” “Bugs Bunny at The Symphony,” “Rodgers & Hammerstein On Stage and Screen,” and many others. Among the many awards he has received, he has been nominated for five Emmy Awards for his work as a director, producer, conductor, and writer of both arts and children’s television for the ABC and PBS networks, and won a Primetime Emmy for his production of “Peter and The Wolf,” which won the Emmy for Outstanding Primetime Children’s Television Program/Series. Daugherty lives in San Francisco.http://imgartists.com/artist/george_daugherty

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  • George Hunka

    Named one of "50 to watch" in a 2007 issue of The Dramatist, the magazine of the Dramatist's Guild, George Hunka has written several plays and essays, as well as reviews, theory and feature stories about theatre for the Guardian (UK), Yale Theatre, The New York Times, PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art, New York Theater Review 2007, Masthead (Australia), and other publications. He guest-edited the theatre section of The Brooklyn Rail for a special symposium on theatre and design in November 2006.He is the artistic director of the theatre minima theatre company. In 2007, he was awarded an Albee Foundation Fellowship.

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  • Gerard Schwarz

    Gerard Schwarz is recognized around the world for his engaging performances and renowned recording history, and for developing Seattle Symphony into an internationally acclaimed orchestra. Following this season, he will return to conduct the Orchestra annually as Conductor Laureate. A passionate champion of the music of our time, Schwarz will introduce 18 world premieres by American composers this season as part of the Gund/Simonyi Farewell Commissions.Schwarz has received 2 Emmy awards, 13 Grammy nominations, six ASCAP awards, and numerous Stereo Review and Ovation awards. His extensive discography of some 260 releases showcases collaborations with the world’s prestigious orchestras, including The Philadelphia Orchestra; the Tokyo, Czech and Royal Liverpool philharmonics; the London Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra National de France and Berlin Radio Symphony; the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra; and the New York Chamber and Seattle symphonies.Schwarz has served on the National Council on the Arts and currently is the Chair of the Advisory Board for the Young Musicians Excelling Fund, which supports student events for the Washington Music Educators Association. In 2002, ASCAP honored him with its Concert Music Award and, in 2003, the Pacific Northwest Branch of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences gave Schwarz its first “IMPACT” lifetime achievement award. In 2009, Schwarz received Seattle’s First Citizen Award and, in 2010, ArtsFund honored him for his extraordinary contributions to the Northwest arts community.Schwarz also is Music Director of the Eastern Music Festival in North Carolina, where he was honored in 2009 by the mayor of Greensboro with the Key to the City. He has served as Music Director of New York’s Mostly Mozart Festival, Waterloo Music Festival, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and New York Chamber Symphony, as well as Artistic Advisor to the Tokyo Philharmonic and Orchard Hall. Schwarz guest conducts around the world and has appeared with many of the great orchestras and pre-eminent soloists of our time. A prolific composer and arranger, Schwarz recently premiered his Trio for Violin, Horn and Piano, hailed as a work of “sophistication and intelligence.”Born to Viennese parents, Schwarz is a graduate of the High School of Performing Arts and The Juilliard School. He is a recipient of the Ditson Conductor’s Award from Columbia University, and was the first American to be named Conductor of the Year by Musical America. He holds honorary doctorates from The Juilliard School, Cornish College of the Arts, Seattle University, University of Puget Sound and Fairleigh Dickinson University. He is an Honorary Fellow of John Moores University, Liverpool.

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  • Giancarlo Guerrero

    Costa Rican conductor Giancarlo Guerrero, now in his sixth season as Music Director of Oregon’s Eugene Symphony, has been appointed Music Director of the Nashville Symphony, beginning with the 2009/10 season. This season, he serves as the Symphony’s Music Director Designate. A champion of new music, Guerrero initiated a guest-composer series in Eugene, where, under his leadership, the ensemble has hosted several of America’s most respected composers, including John Adams, John Corigliano, Jennifer Higdon, Aaron Jay Kernis and Michael Daugherty. Guerrero served as Associate Conductor of the Minnesota Orchestra from 1999-2004. He made his Minnesota Orchestra subscription debut in March 2000, leading the world premiere of John Corigliano’s Phantasmagoria on the Ghosts of Versailles. He returned on subscription every subsequent season during his tenure.As a guest conductor, Guerrero recently made his European debut with the Gulbenkian Orchestra, where he was immediately invited to return, and his UK Debut with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. He has also recently made successful debuts with several major American orchestras, including the Baltimore Symphony, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. Other recent orchestral engagements in North America include appearances with the orchestras of Columbus, Dallas, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Minnesota, Oregon, Phoenix, San Antonio, San Diego, Seattle, Winnipeg and the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, D.C., among others.During the 2007/08 season, Guerrero’s guest conducting engagements include his return appearances with the Cleveland Orchestra both in Cleveland and on tour, including the orchestra’s residency in Miami. He also leads the Australian premiere of Osvaldo Golijov’s chamber opera Ainadamar at the Adelaide Festival. Additional engagements include appearances with the symphony orchestras of Dallas, Kansas City, Milwaukee, San Antonio and San Diego, as well as his return to Nashville in May 2008 for performances of Verdi’s Requiem. Also in demand in both Central and South America, Guerrero conducts regularly in Venezuela, both with the Orquesta Sinfonica Simon Bolivar and the Orquesta Sinfonica de Venezuela.In June 2004, Guerrero was awarded the Helen M. Thompson Award by the American Symphony Orchestra League, which recognizes outstanding achievement among young conductors nationwide. Guerrero holds degrees from Baylor and Northwestern universities. Prior to his tenure with the Minnesota Orchestra, he served as music director of the Tachira Symphony Orchestra in Venezuela.

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  • Greg Sandow

    Greg Sandow began in classical music as an opera singer and a composer, but is best known as a critic-one of the few with a national reputation for writing about both classical music and pop.His classical criticism-which is notably lively and accessible-currently appears in The Wall Street Journal, though he's also written for Vanity Fair, The New York Times, and a host of other publications. On the pop side, he was chief pop critic of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, and music critic and senior music editor at Entertainment Weekly. He's spoken at classical music gatherings, and at a heavy metal convention. He's a contributor both to the authoritative New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, and to The Spin Alternative Record Guide, for which he wrote about Lyle Lovett, and also aabout hiphop and metal acts, including Ice-T and Slayer.As a classical music critic, he's especially interested in the future of the field. This led to an appointment to the Graduate Studies faculty of The Juilhard School, America's leading music conservatory, where he teaches a course called "Classical Music in an Age of Pop." He loves introducing classical music to new audiences, and thinks it can be done in a relaxed, contemporary way, without betraying its artistic depth or its great traditions.After a long hiatus, he has resumed his career as a composer, which in the past had included successful productions of four operas. He travels widely inside the classical music field, serving as a formal and informal consultant. For several orchestras-including the Pittsburgh Symphony-he has written marketing copy that describes concert programs in a way that reaches out to both the existing audience and to new listeners, while completely respecting the music's integrity.

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  • Heather Brown

    Heather Brown is a classical music fan whose real jobs are working in international logistics and transportation during the week and teaching English on the weekends. A Returned Peace Corps volunteer (Bulgaria 2000-2002), she is a graduate of both Indiana University, where she spent three years playing clarinet in the Marching Hundred and Big Red Pep Band, and Fisher College of Business at The Ohio State University. The 2012-2013 season is Heather’s first time ever buying season tickets. Next season, she plans to see even more than a 4-pack’s worth of concerts thanks to a high amount of Mozart, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff on the schedule. While her quest to fill the rear balcony of the Ohio Theatre continues, she has to date, already talked at least one friend into buying season tickets with her. Additionally, she still hopes the CSO will someday take her up on her offer to be a seat filler (during rehearsals) for the clarinet section for which she promises to turn pages but not actually play. In her spare time, she designs knit and crochet patterns for various yarn companies while actively seeking to add more stamps to her passport. She is the author of The Itinerant Knitter a blog about fiber arts, music and cool culture.

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  • Helen Radice

    Helen Radice had a scholarship at Oxford, where she graduated in 2000 with a first, the Gibbs, Vaughan Morgan & Quigley prizes and the Charles Oldham Prize 2000. She then went to the Royal College of Music in London to study harp performance with Ieuan Jones, her current teacher. She was awarded a distinction in her postgraduate performance diploma, thanks to his inspiring lessons. She also recently won the North London Festival and came second in the UFAM International Competition in Paris.Helen's 2003-4 solo/chamber recital engagements include Blackheath Halls Young Artists' Series; St George's, Bristol; the Edinburgh Fringe; St James, Garlickhythe; three recitals at St Martin-in-the-Fields; St James Piccadilly; Deal, Bromsgrove, Hexham and Keswick festivals; Music at Lyddington and the Nehru Centre. She has recently been appointed to the Barkham Harp Quartet and formed a violin and harp duo with Florica Grigoras.In January 2003, together with flutist Catherine Goodman, Helen commissioned and premiered John Mayer's Nava Rasas for flute and harp, which was featured in the World Harp Congress Review. She has also premiered David Gough's Lore of the Land, David Snell's Cavatina and March and given the UK premier of Kate Waring's Flora, all for flute and harp. As part of the Barkham Harp Quartet, she performs new commissions by Ted Watson, Edward Longstaff and Eleanor Turner.Helen enjoys orchestral and show work, with ensembles ranging from the Northern Sinfonia to the Thursford Christmas Spectacular Show Band. She has also begun a career afloat as the recital harpist on board the QE2 (2002) and the Ocean Majesty (2002, 2003).

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  • Henry Fogel

    Henry Fogel is dean and distinguished professor of the arts at Roosevelt University’s Chicago College of Performing Arts. He continues his work as a consultant for orchestras, nationally and internationally, working with the Catherine French Group. He was senior advisor to the League of American Orchestras from June 2008 through June 2009, and for five years served as the League’s president and CEO. From 1985–2003, Mr. Fogel was President of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and from 1981–1985, he served as Executive Director of the National Symphony Orchestra of Washington, D.C. At its 2009 National Conference in Chicago the League presented Fogel with its highest award, the Gold Baton.

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  • Henry Peyrebrune

    Henry Peyrebrune was invited to join The Cleveland Orchestra in 1997. Prior to his appointment, he was principal bassist of the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa, Ontario. He holds a B.M. from the New England Conservatory, where he studied with Edwin Barker. He has performed a wide variety of orchestral, solo, and chamber music with such diverse groups as Apollo’s Fire, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Pops Orchestra, Emmanuel Music, the Handel and Haydn Society, ALEA III and D.C. Hall’s New Concert and Quadrille Band. Currently on faculty at Baldwin-Wallace College Conservatory, Mr. Peyrebrune is a former faculty member of the Longy School of Music and the University of Southern Maine. He has served on the Governing Board of the International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians (ICSOM), and is currently on the boards of the Broadway School of Music and the Arts and NoteWorthy Federal Credit Union.

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  • Holly Mulcahy

    After hearing Scheherazade in an elementary school general music class, Holly Mulcahy fell in love with the violin and knew it would be her future. Since then, she has won a variety of tenured positions in symphonic orchestras from Richmond to Phoenix and has performed on a variety of domestic and international tours including the Washington National Opera Japan tour under the leadership of Placido Domingo and the 2012 Carnegie Hall appearance with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. Additionally, Ms. Mulcahy has performed in the Grand Teton Music Festival since 2003.

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  • James W. Palermo

    James W. Palermo celebrates his thirteenth season as the Artistic and General Director of the Grant Park Music Festival in 2007. Under Mr. Palermo’s leadership, the Festival has expanded to offer innovative community engagement and education programs, and has diversified its mix of music, highlighting in particular the work of living American composers.Mr. Palermo had a key role in the development of the Jay Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park, the Grant Park Music Festival’s permanent home since July 2004. Other highlights of his tenure include the establishment of the Grant Park Orchestral Association, a not for profit organization that supports activities of the Grant Park Music Festival, and the formation of partnerships with Chicago Sister Cities International, the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Children’s Choir and the Sherwood Conservatory. In 2004, the 60-concert community engagement program expanded to include chamber orchestra and choral performances at Chicago Park District neighborhood Cultural Centers and introduced many people from Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods to classical music at downtown Jay Pritzker Pavilion concerts in Millennium Park. Palermo has developed recent novel programmatic initiatives with WTTW11 public television and the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago.In 2004, Palermo was instrumental in the formation of the Apprentice Chorale, a new training chorus comprised of vocal students from the DePaul University School of Music and Roosevelt University’s Chicago College of Performing Arts. The 20-member ensemble trains intensively with Grant Park Chorus Director Christopher Bell, performs ensemble concerts in Chicago landmark locations and parks, as well as along side the professional Grant Park Chorus.The Grant Park Orchestra and Chorus released their debut recording, Independence Eve at Grant Park, in June 1999, a project spearheaded by Mr. Palermo. Since then, the Orchestra has recorded several fully commercial releases on Chicago’s Cedille Records label, including American Works for Organ and Orchestra (2002) and the GRAMMY®-nominated Robert Kurka: Symphonic Works (2004). In the spring of 2006, the Cedille Records label released its two newest recordings of the Grant Park Orchestra and Principal Conductor Carlos Kalmar: Portraits, a program of violin concerti by Szymanowski, Bartok and Martinu featuring Jennifer Koh; and American Orchestral Works, featuring compositions by Barbara Kolb, Michael Hersch, Aaron Jay Kernis, John Corigliano, and John Harbison. In 2008 Cedille will release two more CDs of the Orchestra with Carlos Kalmar, one including works by Aaron Jay Kernis and another featuring internationally renowned mezzo soprano Jennifer Larmore.In 1995, Mr. Palermo came to Chicago from Louisville, Kentucky, where he was orchestra manager of The Louisville Orchestra. Mr. Palermo’s responsibilities there included artistic and operational planning for the Orchestra, and he also assisted in artistic planning and production for the organization’s record label, First Edition Recordings.Prior to his post in Louisville, Mr. Palermo served as general manager of the Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra in southwestern Indiana from 1989-1992. There, he was instrumental in creating a new Family Series, forming a regional Youth Orchestra and a resident string quartet, hiring a new assistant conductor, and enhancing holiday programming, including much-loved holiday pops productions and sold-out Messiah performances.Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, Mr. Palermo showed musical inclination at an early age. He studied at the Cathedral Latin School and later attended Indiana University, where he received Bachelor and Master of Music degrees in trumpet performance. Mr. Palermo performed with the Spoleto Festival Orchestra for two seasons, as well as with the Orquesta Sinfonica Del Valle in Cali, Columbia, and throughout Europe.Palermo was selected as a fellow for the American Symphony Orchestra League’s prestigious Orchestra Management Fellowship Program in 1988-89. As a Fellow, he worked with the orchestras of Colorado Springs, St. Louis, and Cincinnati. Subsequently, Mr. Palermo served on the national committee that oversees, interviews and selects new American Symphony Orchestra League Fellows. He also has testified on behalf of American orchestras before the House Subcommittee on Postal Operations.Mr. Palermo has served as a consultant and board member for a number of organizations, including the Grant Park Cultural and Educational Community, the program planning committee for the Sherwood Conservatory, the music director and executive director search committees for the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra, the 25th anniversary committee for the Chicago Opera Theater and the Executive Director search committee for University of Chicago Presents. Currently, Mr. Palermo serves on the board of the William Ferris Chorale.

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  • Janelle Gelfand

    Janelle Gelfand, a native of the San Francisco Bay Area, has a B.A. in music from Stanford University. She has a Masters Degree in Piano Performance (1976) and a Ph.D. in Musicology (1999) from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), where she was an instructor in music history for three years. Her dissertation is on the life and works of French composer Germaine Tailleferre, one of Les Six.Janelle was named Classical Music Critic for The Cincinnati Enquirer in 1993, and has written for the paper since 1991. She has contributed articles and reviews to Contemporary Music Review, Symphony (the magazine of the American Symphony Orchestra League, Opera News, BBC Music, Journal of the International Alliance for Women in Music, Chamber Music America, Clavier and other magazines and journals. For three years, she authored the Teacher’s Guide to the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Young People’s Concerts, and was editor for Music Research Forum, a musicology journal at CCM. She contributed chapters to the anthology, Women Composers: Music Through the Ages, published by G.K. Hall, and wrote two articles for the most recent edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians.Her awards include the Distinguished Alumnae Award from Friends of Women’s Studies and the University of Cincinnati Alumni Association, and the Corbett Award from the National Federation of Music Clubs for work in her dissertation area. She has won many awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Cincinnati Enquirer, as well as a “Well Done” award from Gannett. She has been named to Who’s Who in America, and is past president of the Stanford Club of Cincinnati, and a past board member of the University of Cincinnati’s Friends of Women’s Studies.Janelle has traveled with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra on three extensive European tours, one tour to Japan and the Cincinnati Pops’ first tour to China and Singapore.

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  • Jason Heath

    Jason Heath is an active double bass performer, educator, blogger, and podcaster. His writing, blogging and podcasting have been featured in the <a href="http://doublebassblog.org/2007/10/doublebassblogorg-makes-the-new-yorker.html">New Yorker</a>, <a href="http://www.insidethearts.com/International_Musician.htm">International Musician</a>, Double Bassist Magazine, The Scroll, <a href="http://www.podcasternews.com/enbr/4492/show-107-symphony-of-leadership/">The Engaging Brand</a>, and the Adjunct Advocate. He is on the board of directors for the <a href="http://isbworldoffice.com">International Society of Bassists</a>, a member of the blogging network <a href="http://insidethearts.com">Inside the Arts</a>, and is a staff writer for <a href="http://bass-musician-magazine.com">Bass Musician Magazine</a>. He has served on the faculties of DePaul University, the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, and Trinity International University, and he is a frequent guest speaker for a variety of organizations.A native of <a href="http://www.travelsd.com/">South Dakota</a>, Jason joined the bass sections of the <a href="http://www.sdsymphony.org/">South Dakota Symphony Orchestra</a> and <a href="http://www.siouxcitysymphony.org/">Sioux City Symphony Orchestra</a> at the age of fifteen. He is a member of the <a href="http://www.elginsymphony.org/">Elgin Symphony</a> and previously served as co-principal bass of the <a href="http://irisorchestra.com/">IRIS Orchestra</a> in Memphis, Tennessee and assistant principal bass of the <a href="http://www.milwaukeeballet.org/">Milwaukee Ballet Orchestra</a>. Jason has also performed with the Lyric Opera of Chicago, Grant Park Symphony, Chicago Opera Theater, Chicago Sinfonietta, Chicago Jazz Philharmonic, and Joffrey Ballet Orchestra. Jason has toured internationally with the American-Russian Young Artists Orchestra, Pacific Music Festival, Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival, and he has also performed with the Spoleto USA Festival, Britt Music Festival, and Des Moines Metro Opera.Jason actively writes about the classical music world and the double bass. His work has been featured in <em>Double Bassist</em> magazine, and his articles and observations about the classical music business can be found on his blog at <a href="http://www.doublebassblog.org/">doublebassblog.org</a>. This blog also includes stories about life as a freelance double bassist, resources for performing musicians and classical music fans, and educational advice for music performance students. Jason is also the host of Contrabass Conversations, a weekly podcast about the double bass. This show can be found at <a href="http://contrabassconversations.com/">contrabassconversations.com</a>, and it features interviews and performances from prominent double bass performers and educators. He has two degrees in double bass performance from Northwestern University and was the recipient of a Civic Orchestra of Chicago fellowship for graduate study. He and his wife Courtney live in Evanston, Illinois with Dan and Angel, their two cats.

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  • Jeremy Denk

    In 1998 <strong>Jeremy Denk</strong> won both the Young Concert Artists International Auditions and received a prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant. Over the past decade the pianist’s career has flourished. The New York Times described his playing as “bracing, effortlessly virtuosic and utterly joyous,” and he has garnered comparable critical acclaim for his engagements with leading orchestras and presenters nationwide. He has appeared as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the St. Louis Symphony, the Houston Symphony, the San Francisco Symphony, the Atlanta Symphony, the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra and many others. The versatile American pianist’s repertoire ranges from the standard works of the 18th and 19th centuries to twentieth-century masters such as Ives, Ligeti, Lutoslawski and Messiaen, and further to new works by leading composers of today. Mr. Denk has participated in many world premieres, including Leon Kirchner’s Duo No. 2 (with violinist Ida Levin) at the Marlboro Music School and Festival in the summer of 2002; Ned Rorem’s The Unquestioned Answer in the summer of 2003; Jake Heggie’s Cut Time in 2001 with the Eos Orchestra; Alternating Current, a work written for him by Kevin Puts, on a Kennedy Center recital program; Mark O’Connor’s Fiddle Sonata (with the composer on fiddle) at the Library of Congress; and also Edgar Meyer’s Sonata for Violin and Piano with Joshua Bell.Mr. Denk made his New York recital debut at Alice Tully Hall in April 1997 as the winner of the Juilliard Piano Debut Award. Writing of the performance, The New York Times described him as “a pianist with a searching mind.” Recent solo appearances include all-Beethoven and all-Bach recitals in Philadelphia, two programs at the Mostly Mozart Festival at New York’s Lincoln Center, as well as recitals in Boston and Washington DC. An avid chamber musician, Jeremy Denk has collaborated with the Borromeo, Brentano, Mirò, St. Lawrence, Shanghai and Vermeer string quartets. Mr. Denk first performed with violinist Joshua Bell at the 2004 Spoleto Festival. Since then, they have toured throughout the United States in and Europe with almost eighty performances to date. The Philadelphia reviewer noted their “equal partnership, with no upstaging.” He has appeared with the Detroit Chamber Music Society, at the Seattle and Santa Fe Chamber Music Festivals and the Spoleto Festivals in Italy and Charleston. The pianist spent several summers at Marlboro in Vermont and has been part of “Musicians from Marlboro” national tours. He also attended the Ravinia Festival’s prestigious Steans Institute. Jeremy Denk has an extensive discography which includes the Tobias Picker Second Piano Concerto with the Moscow Philarmonic; works of Schubert, Bartok, and Strauss with violinist Soovin Kim; the Kirchner Duo with violinist Ida Levin (commemorating Marlboro’s 50th anniversary); and many others. He looks forward to the release of his first solo disc featuring Bach Partitas. Additionally, Joshua Bell and he will record the Corigliano Violin Sonata in June 2007.Jeremy Denk keeps a weblog, <a href="http://jeremydenk.net/blog/">Think Denk</a>. It is a mixture of musical and extramusical observations, often pertaining to nothing in particular. Alex Ross, the music critic of the New Yorker, wrote of it: “Besides being a brilliant musician, Denk is simply one of the most interesting writers I know.” Mr. Denk is a member of the faculty of the Bard College Conservatory of Music. He received a double degree in Chemistry and Piano Performance from the Oberlin College and Conservatory, often infuriating his teacher Joseph Schwartz. He earned a master’s degree in music from Indiana University as a pupil of György Sebök, and a doctorate in piano performance from the Juilliard School, where he worked with Herbert Stessin. He makes his home in New York City.

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  • Jerry Bowles

    Jerry Bowles is founder and editor of <a href="http://www.sequenza21.com/">Sequenza21</a>, the contemporary classical music portal, which was the recipient of the 2005 ASCAP Deems Taylor Internet Award. He is also a veteran writer, editor, publisher and blogger who has written about the arts, business, innovation and technology issues for such magazines as Forbes, Fortune, Esquire and Newsweek for more than 30 years.Bowles is the author of two books on television history, Forever Hold Your Banner High and A Thousand Sundays. In addition to Sequenza21, he has designed, built and maintains three other web sites: <a href="http://www.ancientthespians.com/">The One-Minute Web Guide</a> , and <a href="http://www.bestoftheblogs.com/">Best of the Blogs</a>. He was born and grew up in southern West Virginia and is a graduate of Marshall University and West Virginia University. He lives in New York with his wife, Suzanne, and his cat, Howard.Sequenza21.com is a web-based music portal dedicated to contemporary classical music, especially the music of living composers and performers. Organized as a series of web logs (or blogs), Sequenza21 provides coverage of new music news, reviews of live performances, CD and DVD reviews, a calendar of coming performances and a Composers Forum web log page where music creators gather to share ideas on composition as well as issues that affect the lives of working musicians. The forum is open to any professional or student composer who wants to participate.Sequenza21 is also home to about 20 individual blogs maintained by composers, performers, and conductors as well as a self-service Wiki where anyone involved in contemporary classical music may post information about themselves and their work and even upload samples of their music for visitors to explore. The essence of Sequenza21 is community and the website has attracted a dedicated cadre of contributors and readers since switching to the web log format about a year ago.

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  • Jesse Rosen

    Jesse Rosen, Executive Vice President and Managing Director, American Symphony Orchestra League, joined the League staff in November, 1998, after serving as general manager of the Seattle Symphony, where he was responsible for orchestra operations, electronic media, touring, and special projects. Prior to his position at the Seattle Symphony, Mr. Rosen served as executive vice president and managing director of the American Composers Orchestra in New York City. He also served as orchestra manager of the New York Philharmonic and as vice president of programs for Affiliate Artists, Inc. were he developed and launched the Seaver/NEA Conducting Award and managed the Exxon/Arts Endowment Conductors Program. Mr. Rosen received his bachelor’s degree from the Manhattan School of Music, and pursued graduate studies at The Julliard School. He was a former free-lance bass trombonist who has performed with a variety of ensembles in New York including the American Symphony Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra.Mr. Rosen oversees all League program output in the areas of Learning and Leadership Development, Advocacy, Communications, Research and Information, and Marketing and Membership Development. He leads the League’s strategic planning process and is currently developing the implementation phase of the plan.

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  • Joe Patti

    Joe Patti is the author of <a href="http://www.buttsseats.com/">Butts In The Seats</a> blog which examines, and hopes to suggest, solutions to issues facing arts organizations. Joe is currently the manager of a presenting theatre on a University of Hawaii community college campus. His professional career has seen him as the coordinator of an arts and music festival in South Jersey, Professor and Theatre Business Manager at the University of Central Florida, the marketing department at the Asolo Theatre in Sarasota, FL and included a wonderful summer at the Utah Shakespearean Festival.One day Joe hopes to teach what he has distilled from his experiences and blog contemplations.

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  • Jonathan Becker

    Jonathan Becker is a leader of the Healthcare Practice at a Chicago-based management consulting firm. As you can tell, he's never written about the arts, but he loves his music. If you're quick, you can spot him at concerts in a three-piece suit, holding a flask and a Franz Welser-Möst bobble head.

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  • Kevin Giglinto

    Kevin Giglinto joined the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association’s staff in 1999. Serving first as the organization’s Director of E-Commerce, Mr. Giglinto’s efforts to redesign the CSO’s Web site—www.cso.org—added significant online ticket sales enhancements and more than quadrupled Web sales in his first year. Today, online sales are over ten times greater than prior to the launch of <a href="http://www.cso.org/">www.cso.org</a>.As Vice President for Sales and Marketing, Mr. Giglinto’s primary responsibilities include the development and implementation of broad-based marketing strategies for the CSO and Symphony Center as well as the supervision of all ticket sales, customer service, and retail operations.Prior to joining the CSO, Mr. Giglinto’s previous experience includes positions as Electronic Commerce Marketing Analyst for CNA Financial Corporation; Account Director at TMP Worldwide Advertising & Marketing; and Account Executive for Woodward Direct Advertising.In addition, he served as a Business Development Advisor for the U.S. Peace Corps in Romania, as well as the In-Country Project Director for Washington State University’s Business Development Project in Romania. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing from Marquette University, and an MBA with a specialization in Marketing Management from Loyola University Chicago.

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  • Kim Witman

    <strong>Kim Witman</strong> has been Director of the Wolf Trap Opera Company since 1997 and has been a freelance collaborative pianist and opera coach in the Washington DC area since 1981.Other professional incarnations include those of Registered Music Therapist, church organist, piano teacher and piano bar performer. The Wolf Trap Opera Company features the performances of some of the most promising emerging professional singers in the country, and Kim is responsible for selecting these artists, choosing repertoire to feature them, and overseeing productions that bring them to the stage. Her blog, <a href="http://www.wolftrapopera.blogspot.com">www.wolftrapopera.blogspot.com</a>, aims to allow both patrons and aspiring opera performers to see what’s really happening on the other side of the footlights and the audition table.

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  • Kyle Gann

    Kyle Gann, born 1955 in Dallas, Texas, is a composer and was new-music critic for the Village Voice from 1986 to 2005. Since 1997 he has taught music theory, history, and composition at Bard College. He is the author of The Music of Conlon Nancarrow (Cambridge University Press, 1995), American Music in the 20th Century (Schirmer Books, 1997), Music Downtown: Writings from the Village Voice (University of California Press, 2006), No Such Thing as Silence: John Cage's 4'33" (Yale University Press, 2010), and Robert Ashley (University of Illinois Press, 2010; forthcoming).Gann studied composition with Ben Johnston, Morton Feldman, and Peter Gena, and his music is often microtonal, using up to 37 pitches per octave. His rhythmic language, based on differing successive and simultaneous tempos, was developed from his study of Hopi, Zuni, and Pueblo Indian musics. His music has been performed on the New Music America, Bang on a Can, and Spoleto festivals. His major works include Sunken City, a piano concerto commissioned by the Orkest de Volharding in Amsterdam; Transcendental Sonnets, a 35-minute work for choir and orchestra commissioned by the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir; Custer and Sitting Bull, a microtonal, one-man music theater work he's performed more than 30 times from Brisbane to Moscow; The Planets, commissioned by the Relache ensemble via Music in Motion and continued under a National Endowment for the Arts Individual Artists' Fellowship; and The Hudson River Trilogy, a trio of microtonal chamber operas written with librettist Jeffrey Sichel, the first of which, Cinderella's Bad Magic, was premiered in Moscow and St. Petersburg. In 2007, choreographer Mark Morris made a large-ensemble dance, Looky, from five of Gann's works for Disklavier (computerized player piano).In addition to Bard, Gann has taught at Columbia University, Brooklyn College, the School of the Art Instutute of Chicago, and Bucknell University. His writings include more than 2500 articles for more than 45 publications, including scholarly articles on La Monte Young (in Perspectives of New Music), Henry Cowell, John Cage, Edgard Varèse, Ben Johnston, Mikel Rouse, John Luther Adams, Dennis Johnson, and other American composers. He writes the "American Composer" column for Chamber Music magazine, and he was awarded the Peabody Award (2003), the Stagebill Award (1999) and the Deems-Taylor Award (2003) for his writings. His music is available on the New Albion, New World, Cold Blue, Lovely Music, Mode, Meyer Media, New Tone, and Monroe Street labels. In 2003, the American Music Center awarded Gann its Letter of Distinction, along with Steve Reich, Wayne Shorter, and George Crumb.

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  • Laurie Niles

    Cellist Pablo Casals once said, “Maybe it is music that will save the world,” and <strong>Laurie Niles</strong> believes, “Maybe it is the Internet that will save classical music.” Thus the birth of <a href="http://www.violinist.com/index.cfm">Violinist.com</a>, which Laurie founded with her husband, Robert, in 1996. The website offered Laurie the perfect opportunity to blend her skills as a formally trained professional violinist and a former daily newspaper reporter. Over the past decade, Violinist.com has proven that the Internet can draw together people from all over the world who love classical music, and that it can inflame their passion for it. The site attracts more than 100,000 absolute unique visitors each month, from teens in Kansas blogging about a Suzuki festival to professionals in the Far East sharing practice tips. Laurie lives in Pasadena, Calif., where she maintains a private studio of students, as well as teaches 50 first-graders in the Pasadena public schools, under a city-funded grant. She has played for the Pasadena, New West, Omaha (Neb.) and the Colorado Springs Symphonies and holds a Bachelor of Music degree from Northwestern University. Laurie earned her Master of Arts degree in Journalism from Indiana University, where she also studied violin.

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  • Leonard Slatkin

    Internationally recognized American conductor <strong>Leonard Slatkin</strong> is Music Director of the National Symphony Orchestra, Principal Guest Conductor of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. His performances throughout North America, Europe and the Far East have been distinguished by imaginative programming and highly praised interpretations of both the standard and contemporary symphonic repertoire. Additionally, he is well-known for his arts advocacy work on behalf of music education.Following a successful tenure as Music Director of the Saint Louis Symphony from 1979 until 1996, Mr. Slatkin was named Conductor Laureate. He has also served as Festival Director of the Cleveland Orchestra’s Blossom Festival (1990-99), Principal Guest Conductor of the Philharmonia Orchestra (1997-2000), and Chief Conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra (2000-2004).Mr. Slatkin has made regular appearances with virtually every major international orchestra, including the New York Philharmonic, Berlin Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam, Boston Symphony Orchestra, and many others. His performances of opera have taken him to leading opera companies in the US and around the world, including the Metropolitan Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Washington National Opera, and Vienna State Opera.Leonard Slatkin’s more than 100 recordings have been recognized with five Grammy awards and more than fifty other Grammy nominations. He has recorded with the National Symphony Orchestra, Saint Louis Symphony, Philharmonia Orchestra, London Philharmonic, BBC Symphony Orchestra, London Symphony, and Bayerischer Rundfunk Orchestra.Throughout his career, Mr. Slatkin has demonstrated a continuing commitment to arts education and to reaching diverse audiences. He is the founder and director of the National Conducting Institute, an advanced career development program for rising conductors. Additionally, Mr. Slatkin founded the Saint Louis Symphony Youth Orchestra and has also worked with student orchestras across the United States, including those at the Curtis Institute of Music, The Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music and the Eastman School of Music. He works frequently with youth orchestras across America and abroad, including the DC Youth Orchestra, Midwest Youth Symphony Orchestra, American-Soviet Youth Orchestra, European Community Youth Orchestra, and American Youth Philharmonic. He also reaches out to younger musicians and music teachers through the NSO American Residencies program. During the past few years he has spent time talking about and performing music in Tennessee, North Carolina, Oklahoma, North and South Dakota, and Vermont as part of these residencies.Mr. Slatkin has received many honors and awards, including the 2003 National Medal of Arts (the highest award given to artists by the United States Government), the Chavalier of the Legion of Honor, ASCAP awards with both the National and Saint Louis Symphonies, an honorary doctorate from his alma mater The Juilliard School, the Lifetime Achievement Award at the DC Mayor’s Arts Awards, and the prestigious Declaration of Honor in Silver from the Austrian ambassador to the United States for outstanding contributions to cultural relations.Born in Los Angeles to a distinguished musical family, his parents were the conductor-violinist Felix Slatkin and cellist Eleanor Aller, founding members of the famed Hollywood String Quartet, Mr. Slatkin began his musical studies on the violin and piano before turning to conducting. He is married to soprano Linda Hohenfeld, and they have one son, Daniel.

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  • Lisa Hirsch

    I'm Lisa Hirsch, martial artist, opera geek, technical writer, and classical music writer/blogger. I live in Oakland, CA, and I spend way too much time on The Well, where I am co-host of the Oakland, Classical Music, and Cultures.ind Conferences.If you've run across this page after doing a web search on my name, yes, I'm the Lisa Rachel Hirsch (or Lisa Hirsch) who went to Teaneck High School, in New Jersey (class of 1975), Brandeis University (class of 1980), and SUNY/Stony Brook (1980-82, no degree). In past careers, I worked at Mass. Mutual Life, Fred. S. James & Co., Kaiser Permanente, and Documentum.I was known as Lady Ehrengard von Verlorenblum in the Society for Creative Anachronism, in which I participated from 1975-1979.

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  • Lynn Harrell

    Lynn Harrell’s presence is felt throughout the musical world. A consummate soloist, chamber musician, recitalist, conductor and teacher, his work throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia has placed him in the highest echelon of today’s performing artists.Mr. Harrell is a frequent guest of many leading orchestras including Boston, Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Ottawa, Pittsburgh, and the National Symphony. In Europe he partners with the orchestras of London, Munich, Berlin, Tonhalle and Israel. He has also toured extensively to Australia and New Zealand as well as the Far East, including Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan and Hong Kong. In the summer of 1999 Mr. Harrell was featured in a three-week “Lynn Harrell Cello Festival” with the Hong Kong Philharmonic. He regularly collaborates with such noted conductors as James Levine, Sir Neville Marriner, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta, André Previn, Sir Simon Rattle, Leonard Slatkin, Yuri Temirkanov, Michael Tilson Thomas and David Zinman.In recent seasons Mr. Harrell has particularly enjoyed collaborating with violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter and pianist, André Previn. In January 2004 the trio appeared with the New York Philharmonic performing the Beethoven Triple Concerto with Maestro Masur conducting.An important part of Lynn Harrell’s life is summer music festivals, which include appearances at the Verbier Festival in Switzerland, the Aspen and Grand Tetons festivals, and the Amelia Island Festival.On April 7, 1994, Lynn Harrell appeared at the Vatican with the Royal Philharmonic in a concert dedicated to the memory of the six million Jews who perished in the Holocaust. The audience for this historic event, which was the Vatican’s first official commemoration of the Holocaust, included Pope John Paul II and the Chief Rabbi of Rome. That year Mr. Harrell also appeared live at the Grammy Awards with Itzhak Perlman and Pinchas Zukerman, performing an excerpt from their Grammy-nominated recording of the complete Beethoven String Trios (Angel/EMI).Highlights from an extensive discography of more than 30 recordings include the complete Bach Cello Suites (London/Decca), the world-premiere recording of Victor Herbert’s Cello Concerto No. 1 with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields led by Marriner (London/Decca), the Walton Concerto with Rattle and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI), and the Donald Erb Concerto with Slatkin and the Saint Louis Symphony (New World). Together with Itzhak Perlman and Vladimir Ashkenazy, Mr. Harrell was awarded two Grammy Awards – in 1981 for the Tchaikovsky Piano Trio and in 1987 for the complete Beethoven Piano Trios (both Angel/EMI). A recording of the Schubert Trios with Mr. Ashkenazy and Pinchas Zukerman (London/Decca) was released in February 2000. His May 2000 recording with Kennedy, “Duos for Violin & Cello,” received unanimous critical acclaim (EMI). Most recently, Mr. Harrell recorded Tchaikovsky’s Variations for Cello and Orchestra on a Rococo Theme, Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 2, and Prokofiev’s Sinfonia Concertante with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Gerard Schwarz conducting (Classico).Lynn Harrell’s experience as an educator is wide and varied. From 1985-93 he held the International Chair for Cello Studies at the Royal Academy in London. Concurrently, from 1988-92, he was Artistic Director of the orchestra, chamber music and conductor training program at the L.A. Philharmonic Institute. In 1993, he became head of the Royal Academy in London, a post he held through 1995. He has also given master classes at the Verbier and Aspen festivals and in major metropolitan areas throughout the world. Since the start of the 2002-03 academic year, Mr. Harrell has taught cello at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music.Lynn Harrell was born in New York to musician parents. He began his musical studies in Dallas and proceeded to the Juilliard School and the Curtis Institute of Music. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the first Avery Fisher Award.Mr. Harrell plays a 1720 Montagnana. He makes his home in Santa Monica, CA

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  • Lynn Sislo

    Lynn, an aging housewife who still hasn’t decided what she wants to be when she grows up. She has a husband, two adult sons, one grandson and two cats.

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  • Magda Krance

    Magda Krance is the manager of media relations for Lyric Opera of Chicago, where she has worked since April 1992. Her job includes arranging coverage of Lyric’s artists, productions, and special events by local, national, and international media; writing for the Lyric Opera News, writing press releases, overseeing production and event photography, extensive proofreading, and occasionally baking for her colleagues in marketing-p.r. Career highlights at Lyric include the company’s Ring cycles in 1996 and 2005; and William Bolcom’s three grand operas, starting with McTeague during her first season with the company, continuing with A View from the Bridge (the genesis of which was detailed in an unprecedented nine-part series in The New York Times), and A Wedding in 2004-05. She is also proud to have persuaded Opera News to devote its August 2004 edition to Lyric’s 50th-anniversary season and Chicago in general (with A Wedding’s nuptial couple on the cover).>From 1980 to 1992, Magda worked fulltime as a freelance journalist for several national and local publications, including The New York Times, Time, People, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago Reader, Spy, Self, Playboy, The Washington Post travel section, Outside, Travel & Leisure, Travel Holiday, American Photographer, Vis a Vis (United Airlines’ magazine), American Way, Oceans, and several others. She also worked as a part-time public relations consultant for the now-defunct musical ensemble Basically Bach (1990-91).Since the late 1990s she has written or contributed to several “round-up” features in Chicago Magazine — e.g. “Best of,” “Hidden Pleasures,” “Where to Get Stuff Fixed” (which won a national award for best regional/city magazine service article, or something to that effect), “Best Farmers Markets,” etc.>From 1990-93 Magda worked with a group of Chicago-based women writers on a collection of essays, Reinventing Love, which was published in 1993 by Plume Books.Magda holds a bachelor’s degree in art and writing from Macalester College in St. Paul in 1976 and a master of science in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. A native of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, she has lived in Chicago since 1976. In 1978 she married Steve Leonard, a professional photographer (originally from Grand Marais, Minnesota, and also a Macalester grad). They have one son, Casimir, 16, a high-school junior and former operatic super (Cavalleria rusticana in 2004, Aida in 1994). Magda sings second alto with Bella Voce (formerly His Majestie’s Clerkes), a professional acappella ensemble.Magda’s mother and aunts were the subject of a documentary released in 2006, The Lilpop Sisters and Their Passions, which had its official U.S. premiere at the Polish Film Festival in America (in Chicago) on Nov. 19 & 21.

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  • Marc van Bree

    Dutch native Marc van Bree is a public relations practitioner with a broad experience communicating—on and offline—in the nonprofit and cultural environment. He blogs at <a title="Dutch Perspective" href="http://mcmvanbree.com/dutchperspective">Dutch Perspective</a> on the intersection of communications, culture and social media. Recent <a href="http://mcmvanbree.com/projects.htm">projects</a> include the "Orchestras and Social Media Survey" and an ebook "Orchestras and New Media: A Complete Guide."Marc provides communications and social media <a title="Hire Marc van Bree" href="http://mcmvanbree.com/hireme.htm">consulting</a> for nonprofits and cultural institutions. He is currently employed as public affairs associate at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. At Chapin Hall, he implements research dissemination strategies and produces events and conferences.Marc joined Chapin Hall from the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, one of the world's premier orchestras, where he served as public relations coordinator and later as publicist. At the Chicago Symphony, Marc took on an active role in the organization's online communications strategy. He developed the CSO's first online, multimedia press room; initiated the organization's Facebook and Twitter pages, reaching nearly 10,000 fans; built relationships with industry and local bloggers; and managed weekly dynamic Web content for BP CSO Radio Broadcasts.Marc graduated <em>cum laude</em> from Columbia College Chicago, the nation's largest arts and communications college, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Marketing Communication and a concentration in Public Relations.

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  • Mark Clague

    Mark Clague, Ph.D. serves as Associate Professor of Musicology in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance at the University of Michigan, where he also holds appointments in American Culture and AfroAmerican and African Studies and serves as Director of the University’s American Music Institute. A frequent speaker at national and international conferences and colloquia, his research interests range from American orchestras and composers to the history of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” He has been a pre-concert speaker or writer for programs by the Detroit and Chicago Symphonies and is currently a historical consultant for the San Francisco Symphony’s centennial celebration; with Michael Mauskapf and Joseph Horowitz, he hosted the American Orchestras Summit at the Universitya of Michigan in January, 2010. He also serves as Project Editor for the Second Edition of the New Grove Dictionary of American Music and as founding faculty advisor and board member of Arts Enterprise.

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  • Matthew Guerrieri

    <strong>Matthew Guerrieri </strong>is a composer, pianist, and writer whose music has been called “gorgeous” by the New York Times, and who is often heard in recital in the Boston area. He writes regularly for the<em>Boston Globe</em>, and his articles have also appeared in <em>NewMusicBox, Playbill,</em> and <em>Slate</em> magazines. He is responsible for the popular classical music weblog “<a href="http://sohothedog.blogspot.com">Soho the Dog</a>.”A former fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center, he also holds degrees from DePaul and Boston Universities.

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  • Matthew Heller

    Double Bassist <strong>Matthew Heller</strong> joined the <a href="http://www.cpo-live.com/main/">Calgary Philharmonic</a> in fall 2007. A native of Tacoma, Washington, Mr. Heller has performed as a member of the New World Symphony (Miami, Florida), Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, and Civic Orchestra of Chicago. He has been an orchestral fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center and the Verbier Festival, and performed chamber music with the St. Lawrence String Quartet at the Spoleto Festival USA in 2005 and 2006. Matthew completed studies at the New England Conservatory, with Donald Palma of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra; and at Northwestern University with Chicago Symphony bassist Michael Hovnanian. He was a prizewinner at the International Society of Bassists’ orchestral competition in 2007.

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  • Maura Lafferty

    Maura Lafferty designs and executes modern communication strategies for creative professionals and arts organizations, informed by the cultural shifts the technology sector is bringing to the San Francisco Bay Area. A passionate advocate for audience development and arts philanthropy, Maura has presented on best-practice marketing and social media practices for Opera America, Chorus America, and TechSoup, and on community engagement and arts philanthropy for the Emerging Arts Professionals. More information at http://mauralaffertypr.com

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  • Michael Tiknis

    <strong>Michael Tiknis</strong>, currently the Managing Director of the <a href="http://www.harristheaterchicago.org/home">Joan W. and Irving B. Harris Theater for Music and Dance</a>, possesses a diverse background in the administration of the performing arts. His experience includes more than 30 years of work in arts related enterprise.He previously held the position of President/CEO of the Midland Center for the Arts in Midland, Michigan. The Midland Center for the Arts is a 250,000 square foot multi disciplinary facility with two performance venues, two museums and historic sites; it presents or produces over 400 events each season. It was a project of the Dow Family begun more than 35 years ago.Prior to the Midland Center for the Arts, Mr. Tiknis worked with numerous symphony orchestras across the country, including: Managing Director of Virginia Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, San Diego Symphony Orchestra and Honolulu Symphony Orchestra. He was the Managing Director of Houston’s Tony award-winning Alley Theater and has also worked with the San Antonio Symphony, Cincinnati Symphony and at Herbert Barrett Management in New York,Mr. Tiknis did undergraduate study at Seton Hall University in New Jersey and has done graduate coursework at Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and at New School University in New York.Michael Tiknis has designed and created concert and exhibition activities, and successfully conducted several multi-million dollar fundraising, capital, endowment, marketing and ticket sales campaigns.Mr. Tiknis has served on the Board of Directors of a variety of non-profit and professional service organizations and guest lectured at numerous institutions.

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  • Molly Sheridan

    Deems Taylor award-winning writer <strong><strong><strong>Molly Sheridan</strong></strong></strong> is the director of <a href="http://www.counterstreamradio.org/">Counterstream Radio</a> and the managing editor of <a href="http://www.newmusicbox.org/">NewMusicBox.org</a>, both programs of the American Music Center. She is also the host of Carnegie Hall’s <a href="http://www.carnegiehall.org/article/sound_insights/works/interviews/wrk_interviews.html">Sound Insights</a> podcasts, and her writing appears in publications such as The Washington Post, Time Out New York, and on her ArtsJournal blog, <a href="http://www.artsjournal.com/gap">Mind the Gap</a>.She attended the Honors Tutorial College at Ohio University, earning a bachelor’s in journalism with a specialization in violin performance and French in 1999. She currently divides her time between New York City and Baltimore, where she lives with her husband, the saxophonist (and TAFTO 2006 <a href="http://adaptistration.com/?p=913">contributor</a>) Brian Sacawa.

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  • Patricia Mitchell

    Okay … that’s my name for programs. Everyone else calls me Patty (or mom, or “hey you”, and one person even called me “dude”).I began blogging in January of 2003. (You can read my old blog pages compiled <a href="http://oboeinsight.com/2006/01/08/my-old-blog/">here</a> if you want to waste a lot of time!)I am the principal oboist of <a href="http://www.operasj.org/default.htm">Opera San Jose</a>, second oboist for <a href="http://www.balletsanjose.org/">Ballet San Jose Silicon Valley</a>, second oboist (acting principal for 2003-2004) and English hornist of <a href="http://www.symphonysanjose.org/home.asp">Symphony Silicon Valley</a>. I also freelance in the Bay Area, and teach at <a href="http://www.ucsc.edu/public/">University of California, Santa Cruz</a> and privately at my home.Wondering what I’m doing at the moment? Check out my <a href="http://oboeinsight.com/dated-material/my-performance-schedule/">performance schedule</a> and you’ll see! Want to know what I have done? Check out my <a href="http://oboeinsight.com/2005/02/04/resume/">resumé</a>.At this site you will find information for <a href="http://oboeinsight.com/instruction/uc-santa-cruz/">students at UCSC</a> and my <a href="http://oboeinsight.com/instruction/private-students/">private students</a>. Along with a whole lot of other stuff. Just because.

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  • Paul Alter

    The only musical skill Paul A. Alter possesses is listening, at which he claims he is quite adept. He never learned to play a musical instrument, and he passed his chorus class at Hanley Junior High School, University City, Missouri, by promising the instructor he would sit in the back of the class and never sing.Among the music he enjoyed, growing up in and around St. Louis, were the St. Louis Symphony, operettas and musicals out of doors at the “Muny Opera,” moldy-fig jazz, dance band music, big swing bands, hillbilly music, concert bands, marching bands, and impromptu sessions of chamber music played by members of the SLSO in the living rooms of their homes. When the swing bands died, and Patti Page’s version of “How Much Is That Doggy in the Window?” was released, his interest in current popular music died, but not his devotion to the popular music previous to that point.After his service as a Hospital Corpsman, Pharmacist Mate 3rd Class, in WWII, he received has degree of BA in Theater Arts, Motion Picture Major, from UCLA. This was followed by a variety of jobs, including research studies of audiovisual media as training tools, development of job skills via multimedia (job aids, film, videotape, audiotape with workbook, computer-based tutoring, programmed instruction), stints in commercial TV and public TV, and research into the design and development and conduct of using informational campaigns to change public attitude — for example, increasing the use of automobile seat belts.Since his retirement 15 years ago, Alter has assumed the role of gadfly, attempting to move concert music organizations to open up to the public, encompassing it as much as possible into day-to-day operations. He is especially adamant in his position that musical groups must reach out to influential members of the community and empower them to function as “Centers of Influence” who can bring friends, family, and associates to the love of concert music and into attending concerts.He has two cats, one of which loves Bruckner, but will not tolerate Jerome Kern.

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  • Paul Bailey

    Paul Bailey, trombone/kaossilator/laptop, is a performer/composer/teacher and is interested in composing and performing music using the broken-consort, open score and modular improvisational ideals. He has worked as staff musician disneyland and taught at John Marshall High School in Los Angeles and Viewpoint School at Calabasas, Ca, and currently teaches music education and music theory classes at California State University Fullerton and at music courses at the Heritage College Ready Academy Charter School in Los Angeles. He is a member of the arroyo arts collective and lives in Highland Park (a suburb of Los Angeles) with his wife Debbie, and assorted critters; Dolly, Javi, Peepers, Twinkie, Sasha and Lucy.Sylvia Desrochers, Soprano, is a prolific vocalist singer and actress from Los Angeles California who excels in pop and opera realms of music and always put her beautiful flavoring into every song that she sings.

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  • Paul Helfrich

    Paul Helfrich is President of the Dayton Performing Arts Alliance.  He received his Bachelor of Music degree (with distinction) from Indiana University – Bloomington in 1984, and a Master's degree in Arts Administration, also from Indiana University, in 1986. Mr. Helfrich came to Dayton to serve as President of the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra in October 2008.  In less than four years, he has overseen the launch of two new series including the highly successful Rockin’ Orchestra series, the completion of a $1.5 million special fundraising campaign called Protect & Secure, and played a key role in the merger of the Dayton Philharmonic with the Dayton Ballet and Dayton Opera to create the new Dayton Performing Arts Alliance.   Prior to his arrival in Dayton, he served 12 years as Executive Director of the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra in Charleston, West Virginia.  His time there saw a great expansion of the orchestra’s concert, touring, and education programs. Mr. Helfrich has also served as Executive Director of the Erie Philharmonic and Director of Marketing for the Kalamazoo Symphony.

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  • Pete Matthews

    Pete Matthews lives in New York, where he is a marketing and new media professional, specializing in surveying trends and planning effective communication strategies for a wide range of clients. He is also a devoted advocate of classical music, an interest he first realized during his four years as an announcer, interviewer and program director at WSND-FM at the University of Notre Dame.In 2004, Pete completed the American Symphony Orchestra League's "Essentials in Orchestra Management" seminar, which in ten days sought to provide a survey of all aspects of running a modern orchestra: from marketing, to finance, to development, to labor management. He is currently the author of the blog <a href="http://www.FeastofMusic.com">Feast of Music</a>, which covers the vast and varied music scene in New York City. His first blog, <a href="http://stepsofmozart.blogspot.com/">Steps Of Mozart</a>, traced his travels through key locations in Mozart's life during the week of his 250th birthday in January, 2006.

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  • Philip Paschke

    Philip Paschke is the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra’s New Media Specialist, responsible for their online presence and marketing. Philip’s first forays into digital content started in the 1980s on a Commodore 64, and his fascination with new creative technology has continued ever since.Philip’s musical training began at age six with piano lessons, and he was a frequent performer in the Canadian Composers Festival. Philip holds a Bachelor of Music degree in Theory and Composition from the University of Alberta, where he studied with Laurie Radford, Howard Bashaw and Paul Steenhuisen. He also has an interest in film music and has studied film scoring with Hummie Mann.

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  • Proper Discord

    Proper Discord is a blog about classical music, marketing and the Internet. It was launched in March 2009. Recurring themes include epistemology, making fun of album art and questioning the assertions of music pundits. In an attempt to avoid confusion, its author prefers to remain anonymous and encourages you to consider that he (and everybody else) might have a conflict of interest.

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  • Robert Birman

    Robert Birman joined the Louisville Orchestra as Chief Operating Officer in October 2008 and became Chief Executive Officer on June 1, 2009. He served as Executive Director of San Francisco’s Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra from 2001, the nation’s premier period-instrument orchestra, overseeing national and international tours, Internet distribution of recordings and debut engagements at Carnegie Hall, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Ravinia Festival, The Concertgebouw and the BBC Proms, among others. Having served for four years each as the chief executive of the Santa Barbara Symphony and Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra of Boston, he also served as the executive director of the Dubuque Symphony; arts administration fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts; an ISPA fellow at the New World Symphony in Miami Beach; and worked two summers at the Colorado Music Festival in Boulder. Mr. Birman has been a member of the Board of Directors and is Past President of the Association of California Symphony Orchestras. He has served on grants panels for the National Endowment for the Arts, California Arts Council, Kentucky Arts Council, and The Heinz Endowments and is a presenter and participant in programs of the League of American Orchestras’ Orchestra Leadership Academy.

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  • Roger Bourland

    Roger Bourland is a composer, a professor and Chair of the UCLA Department of Music, a music publisher and a blogger. More: http://rogerbourland.com

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  • Roger Ruggeri

    A member of the Rochester Philharmonic and Dallas Symphony before joining the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra in 1962, <strong>Roger Ruggeri</strong> served as Principal Double Bassist from 1963 until stepping back from that position in 2005. A graduate of the Eastman School of Music, Ruggeri has been featured as a soloist and a composer with a number of organizations, including the Milwaukee Symphony and the Grand Teton Music Festival (WY). He has taught at Southern Methodist University, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.Without double bass in hand, Ruggeri is active as a composer, program annotator and lecturer. Since beginning as the MSO’s program annotator in 1968, Ruggeri has gone on to provide concert notes for major arts organizations throughout the country. Ruggeri is a former vice-president of the International Society of Bassists and a past Double Bass Forum Editor for the <em>American String Teacher</em>.Ruggeri was elected by his colleagues in 1994 as a Musician Representative to the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra Board; he is active on several Board committees. Since 1999 he has been a member of the Executive Board of Milwaukee’s musicians’ union (Local #8). He served as chair of the Grand Teton Music Festival Players’ Board from 1997 to 2003 and since 2004 as chair of the MSO Players’ Council. Ruggeri was also a panelist-consultant to the Music Program of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Wisconsin Arts Board.

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  • Ron Spigelman

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  • Sam Bergman

    Sam Bergman joined the Minnesota Orchestra in February 2000 at the age of 23. In addition to his duties in the viola section, he serves as host and writer for the orchestra’s Inside the Classics concert series, co-authors a companion blog to the series with conductor Sarah Hicks and occasionally appears as host of the orchestra’s Young People’s Concerts.Before arriving in Minneapolis, Bergman was a member of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra for two seasons. He graduated from Ohio’s Oberlin Conservatory of Music, where he studied viola with Jeffrey Irvine and the Cleveland Orchestra’s Lynne Ramsey.Bergman has written about music and the music business for a variety of publications, and from 2001 to 2008 he served as news editor for the online arts news digest ArtsJournal. His 2004 diary documenting the Minnesota Orchestra’s European tour, written for ArtsJournal, was hailed by the Washington Post as a refreshingly candid look at the orchestra world.Originally from Boston, he grew up primarily in small-town Pennsylvania, making regular summer pilgrimages to Minnesota, where much of his extended family lives. He spends part of his summers teaching and coaching chamber music at Greenwood Music Camp in rural Massachusetts, and has served on the faculties of St. Olaf College and New Hampshire’s Apple Hill Center for Chamber Music. He plays a Canadian viola crafted by John Newton in 1992 from the salvaged timbers of an Ontario barn.

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  • Scott Silberstein

    Scott Silberstein is the executive producer of HMS Media, a media production company he co-founded with Matt Hoffman in 1988 that has received 17 Emmy Awards and 24 Emmy nominations for documentaries on the arts and social issues. Scott is an 6-time Emmy winner for producing Dance For Life, The Chicago Dance Project, Steppenwolf Theatre Company: 25 Years on the Edge, Reality of a Dreamer: River North Dance Company, Why Am I Hiding & Artbeat Chicago. He has most recently produced the pledge special Under The Streetlamp (which launched the eponymous four-person vocal group to national acclaim), and A Christmas Carol In Concert (which premieres on PBS in December 2013). He has also been Emmy-nominated for producing Every Dancer Has A Story, Billy Sunday, Jump Rhythm Jazz Project: Getting There, River North Rising, Just Passing Through with Shawn Colvin, Julia Fordham and October Project, and a Homeless PSA Campaign for the City of Chicago (featuring Phil Collins and Genesis). A classically trained and scholarship winning pianist, Scott was also Emmy nominated for composing music for Nothing Is Simple (NBC) and The World of Anne Frank (WTTW), and has composed original scores for nearly two dozen dance and theater pieces, including Kira The Young Hunter with Phil Collins, 12 Dancing Princesses and the upcoming The Golden Bird with Key & Peele’s Keegan-Michael Key. He and Matt have been jointly given four Ruth Page Awards, Chicago dance’s highest honor, and are also Jeff Award nominees.Scott has produced television projects for dozens of Broadway shows and national tours including Motown: The Musical, The Book of Mormon, Kinky Boots, West Side Story, Rent, Mamma Mia, Hairspray, Jersey Boys, Wicked, Billy Elliott, In The Heights, Next To Normal, Dreamgirls, How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, A Little Night Music and many others, as well as for resident companies including Lookingglass Theatre Company, The Public Theatre, Jump Rhythm Jazz Project, Steppenwolf Theatre, The Goodman Theatre, Chicago Shakespeare Theater, The Guthrie Theatre, Roundabout Theater, The Joffrey Ballet, River North Dance Chicago, Giordano Dance Chicago, Pilobolus Dance Company, Marriott’s Lincolnshire Theatre and the Jazz Dance World Congress.Scott is a company member of Lookingglass Theatre Company, a board member for Audience Architects (an advocacy and marketing organization for Chicago dance), and an advisory board member to a multitude of Chicago arts non-profits including River North Chicago Dance Company, Giordano Jazz Dance Chicago, Bonedanse, Zephyr Dance Ensemble, Jump Rhythm Jazz Project and Mad Shak.

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  • Scott Spiegelberg

    Scott Spiegelberg has a Bachelor of Music degree in trumpet and Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry from Lawrence University. He then earned a Master of Music in trumpet performance from the University of Akron, and a Master of Arts in theory pedagogy and Ph.D. in music theory from the Eastman School of Music. His research interests are on the perception and cognition of music and theory pedagogy. He also performs the Renaissance cornetto and studies the history of trumpet articulation. He has presented at conferences of the Society for Music Theory, the Society for Music Perception and Cognition, the Music Theory Society of New York State, the Dutch-Flemish Society of Music Theory, and the 2005 Neuroscience and Music II conference in Leipzig, Germany. His articles have been published in Empirical Musicology Review, Computer Music Journal, and the Dutch Journal of Music Theory. His blog, <a href="http://musicalperceptions.blogspot.com/">Musical Perceptions</a>, receives over 100 readers each day. Coordinator of the Music Theory program at DePauw University, Dr. Spiegelberg has taught at Indiana University, the University of Minnesota, Valley City State University, Buffalo State College, the University of Akron, and the Eastman School of Music.

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  • Sean Hickey

    Born in Detroit, Michigan in 1970, Sean Hickey’s earliest music education began at age 12 with an electric guitar, a Peavey amp, and a stack of Van Halen records, the early ones of course. He studied jazz guitar at Oakland University, later graduating with a degree in composition and theory from Wayne State University. His primary instructors were James Hartway, James Lentini and Leslie Bassett. Several of his recording and concert reviews may be found in the pages of the New Music Connoisseur, 21st Century Music, Modern Dance and numerous other publications. He is also a principal contributor to the Omnibus Guide to Classical Music on CD, has contributed liner notes to dozens of classical recordings and is a voting member of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. His travel and adventure pieces have appeared in Transitions Abroad, the Burlington Free Press, Trailworks, Trailsource, Orlando Weekly, ITN, Babylon Travel and elsewhere. Otra Dia, a travelogue of the writer’s travels in Peru, was published by Cantabile Press. He also lectures extensively on career options and marketing strategy for composers.

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  • Sir Andrew Davis

    Sir Andrew Davis has served as Music Director & Principal Conductor of Lyric Opera of Chicago since 2000, where he will conduct four of the eight productions presented in the 2008-2009 season. Maestro Davis is the Conductor Laureate of the Toronto Symphony (having previously served as the Principal Conductor), the Conductor Laureate of the BBC Symphony Orchestra (having served as the 2nd longest running Chief Conductor since its founder, Sir Adrian Boult) and the former Music Director of the Glyndebourne Festival Opera.Born in 1944 in Hertfordshire, England, Maestro Davis studied at King’s College, Cambridge, where he was an organ scholar before taking up the baton. His diverse repertoire ranges from baroque to contemporary, and his vast conducting credits span the symphonic and operatic and choral worlds. In addition to the core symphonic and operatic composers, he is a great proponent of twentieth century works including those by Janacek, Messiaen, Boulez, Elgar, Tippett and Britten.With the BBC Symphony Orchestra, Maestro Davis has led concerts at the London Proms and on tour to Hong Kong, Japan, the US, and Europe. He has conducted all of the major orchestras of the world from the Chicago Symphony to the Berlin Philarmonic to the Royal Concertgebouw, and at opera houses throughout the world including the Metropolitan Opera, La Scala and the Bayreuth Festival.Maestro Davis is also a prolific recording artist. He has recorded for Decca, Deutsche Grammophone, Warner Classics International, Capriccio, EMI and CBS, performances. Recent releases include the Beethoven Violin Concerto with violinist Min-Jyn Kim and the London Philharmonia on the Sony label, and a CD of operatic favorites on the Decca label, featuring soprano Nicole Cabell.In 1992, Maestro Davis was created a Commander of the British Empire for his services to British Music, and in 1999 he was made a Knight Bachelor in the New Year Honours List. In 1991, he received the Royal Philharmonic Society/Charles Heidsieck Music Award.Maestro Davis and his wife, soprano Gianna Rolandi, reside in Chicago where she is the Director of the Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Opera Center at Lyric Opera of Chicago. For more information about Maestro Davis, please visit his web site at www.sirandrewdavis.com.

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  • Tim Hankewich

    Hankewich, who is popular with audiences and critics alike, has earned an outstanding reputation as a maestro whose classical artistry is as inspiring as his personality is engaging. While conducting Dvorak's Symphony No. 7 in D minor at a Cedar Rapids Symphony concert in January 2006, the Cedar Rapids Gazette applauded him for "directing without a musical score and displaying a command of the selection and the orchestra." In 2002, The Kansas City Star named his performance of Strauss' Four Last Songs one of "15 Great Moments in Classical Music and Dance in 2002." The previous season, following Hankewich's last-minute appearance on the podium for a challenging program of Takemitsu, Adams, Scriabin, and Debussy, critic Paul Horsley described Hankewich as a "commanding figure onstage, with a mellifluously physical conducting style that must be impossible for a player not to respond to. There is an easygoing fluidity to his phrasing, rubato and tempos and the orchestra seems especially animated."

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  • Tim Judd

    A native of Upstate New York, Timothy Judd has been a member of the Richmond Symphony violin section since 2001. He is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music where he earned the degrees Bachelor of Music and Master of Music, studying with world renowned Ukranian-American violinist Oleh Krysa.The son of public school music educators, Timothy Judd began violin lessons at the age of four through Eastman's Community Education Division. He was a student of Anastasia Jempelis, one of the earliest champions of the Suzuki method in the United States. Other influential teachers include Charles Haupt, Victor Danchenko, James Buswell, David Cerone and the members of the Lydian String Quartet.Mr. Judd has performed with the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra, Virginia Symphony Orchestra, Albany Symphony, Erie Philharmonic, Slee Sinfonietta, Rochester Chamber Orchestra and Skaneateles Festival Orchestra. He is a former member of the Western New York Chamber Orchestra and is currently a member of the Williamsburg Symphonia. As an orchestral musician he has performed at New York's Alice Tully Hall and the Kennedy Center in Washington. Throughout his career Mr. Judd has appeared with such notable and diverse performers as Gil Shaham, Renee Fleming, Garrison Keillor, and the rock band Yes.Timothy Judd also enjoys playing chamber music, recently becoming a founding member of "Crescendo: Mike Goldberg and Friends", an organization which has performed throughout Central Virginia. A passionate teacher, Mr. Judd has maintained a private violin studio in the Richmond area since 2002 and has been active coaching chamber music and numerous youth orchestra sectionals.In addition to performing and teaching, Timothy Judd has contributed articles to "Polyphonic.org- The Orchestra Musician Forum" and Drew McManus's "Adaptistration" through the "Take A Friend To The Orchestra" series.In his free time, Timothy Judd enjoys working out with Richmond's popular SEAL Team Physical Training program.

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  • William Eddins

    Bill Eddins is Music Director of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. A native of Buffalo, N.Y., he currently resides in Minneapolis with his lovely wife Jen, a clarinetist, and their two boys Raef (AKA Raefster; Munchers) and Riley (AKA Squeaky; The Imp; Dr. No).Bill has been playing piano since he was five when his parents bought a Wurlitzer Grand piano at a garage sale. He started conducting during his sophomore year at the Eastman School of Music, and most of the ’80s were spent trying to decide whether to pursue a career in conducting or piano. The quandary was answered for him when he realized that the life of a poor, starving pianist was for the birds. In 1989 Bill decided to study conducting with Dan Lewis at the University of Southern California, from whence he managed to land assistant conductor posts with the Chicago Symphony and the Minnesota Orchestra in 1992.Bill has many non-musical hobbies including: cooking, eating, discussing food, and planning dinner parties. He is also quite fond of biking, tennis, reading, and pinball. Unfortunately, due to pianistic paranoia his days in the martial arts are long over.Bill is committed to bringing classical music to the greater public. He has started a podcast – Classical Connections – which is dedicated to exploring the history of classical music and highlights live chamber music performances in which Bill has taken part (check it out for yourself at Bill Eddins’ website). He has also produced a solo piano CD – Bad Boys, Volume I – which features Beethoven’s “Hammerklavier” Sonata and Albright’s Nightmare Fantasy Rag.

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